YOUNG GRADUATE FARMER AYUK OROCK FROM CAMEROON

Transnational Investigation: The FAIRTRADE Chocolate Rip-off

In a six-month transnational project led by the Forum for African Investigative Reporters (FAIR), journalists hailing from Ivory Coast, Ghana, Cameroon, Nigeria and the Netherlands investigated the alleged benefits received by cocoa farmers in West Africa via the FAIRTRADE label. Their conclusions are shocking: whilst the chocolate consumer in the West pays a significant mark-up for ‘honest’ chocolate, these benefits amount to little or no improvement in the lives of cocoa farmers. In some case, because of FAIRTRADE cooperatives’ increasing dominance, farmers were even worse off than before. 

The full dossier is titled ‘The FAIRTRADE chocolate rip-off’, and was partly funded by the Programme for African Investigative Reporters (PAIR).  The story, parts of which have already been published in Dutch, has caused a stir in the Netherlands.

Download a copy of the  Transnational Investigation (pdf).  See full text of the investigation below.

The FAIRTRADE chocolate rip-off

Team: Selay Kouassi (Ivory Coast), Chief Bisong Etahoben (Cameroon), Benjamin Tetteh (Ghana), Aniefiok Udonquak (Nigeria), Bjinse Dankert and Janneke Donkerlo (Netherlands), Charles Rukuni (team leader), Evelyn Groenink (editor) 

The pictures of happy African farmers on the FAIRTRADE chocolate bought by consumers in the West are designed to make the consumer believe that the broad smiles are a result of actual fair trade: support and a better income.  But this impression is false. Exploitation in the West African cocoa industry continues, only with a new player on the block: FAIRTRADE itself, which benefits from the extra mark-up paid by supportive consumers. The FAIRTRADE label (issued by FAIRTRADE’s own certifying sister company Flo-Cert), hailed 20 years ago as an innovative institution which would improve the lives of farmers in the cocoa industry in West Africa, has not lived up to its promises.

Farmers selling through the FAIRTRADE circuit:

  • Do not receive more income for their harvests than ‘ordinary’ farmers;
  • Are kept uninformed about world market cocoa prices by FAIRTRADE cooperatives that are meant to empower them;
  • Receive little or no benefits from bonuses and premiums that are paid to the FAIRTRADE cooperatives from extra FAIRTRADE moneys paid by consumers;
  • Have often not been told how, or even that, FAIRTRADE is supposed to benefit them;
  • Are sometimes squeezed out of farming in areas where FAIRTRADE cooperatives have become dominant.

Additionally, in Ivory Coast, individuals in the notorious ‘cocoa mafia’ have become kingpins as partners in the FAIRTRADE cooperatives. In Ghana, where FAIRTRADE has established tight links with the state Cocoa Board (COCOBOD), agricultural experts complain that the FAIRTRADE model perpetuates the traditional ‘unfair’ trading system whereby the farmer remains at the bottom end.

Most poignantly, annual reports of FAIRTRADE’s brand holder in the Netherlands, Max Havelaar, show that, after paying the normal market price for cocoa, the party making the most extra money out of FAIRTRADE cocoa sold is FAIRTRADE itself. Max Havelaar makes around 6 US cents from every FAIRTRADE chocolate bar of US$ 2.50. In contrast, the FAIRTRADE premium paid to the West African cooperatives from the same bar of chocolate only amounts to 2.5 US cents (see graph 1). For example, the Dutch FAIRTRADE certifying institution made Eur 417,681 (around US$ 520,000) from licence fees (paid to them by chocolate companies for the right to use the FAIRTRADE logo)  in 2009, whilst less than half of that amount ( Eur 175,000 or US$ 218,750) was paid to cocoa-producing FAIRTRADE cooperatives in that year.

These are the findings from a six-month Transnational Investigation carried out by journalists from the Forum for African Investigative Reporters (FAIR) in Ivory Coast, Cameroon, Ghana and Nigeria, together with colleagues in the Netherlands and supported by the Programme for African Investigative Reporting (PAIR).

This comprehensive journalistic investigation into FAIRTRADE promises and practices covers the entire West African cocoa-producing region. It was undertaken after Ivory Coast team member Selay Kouassi first investigated FAIRTRADE and other general certification activities in the cocoa sector in Ivory Coast. After his  first story on on this topic, Kouassi received a number of threatening phone calls and had to go into hiding. Several of his sources were also threatened. 

The threats were the reason for FAIR to embark on a region-wide investigation into the same subject, in line with the ‘Arizona principle1  that says that an investigation needs to be extended and deepened as soon as ‘the journalist  investigating  the story finds that he or she is under threat. The Arizona message is: you can silence a journalist, but you cannot kill a story. This investigation into FAIRTRADE promises and practices is therefore an Arizona project. (For a reference on the origin of the name ‘Arizona project’, click here: http://legacy.ire.org/history/arizonaproject.html)

It is, however, important to note that it is not clear from which cooperative in the lucrative cocoa sector in Ivory Coast the threats against Kouassi and his sources originated2.  This investigation focuses exclusively on the FAIRTRADE label, because this is the only label that promises a better income for the cocoa-producing farmer. It was this promise that was tested, and that was shown to be, largely, false.  It was also the core argument in Kouassi’s earlier work.

For the investigation, the team:

  1. Visited dozens of cocoa farms and cooperatives, and interviewed over 70 farmers in Ivory Coast, Ghana, Cameroon and Nigeria (associated and non-associated with FAIRTRADE)
  2. Interviewed representatives, and perused documents, of FAIRTRADE Cooperatives in Ivory Coast, Ghana and Cameroon
  3. Accessed government documents and statistics in Ivory Coast, Ghana, Cameroon and Nigeria
  4. Interviewed farmer union representatives in Nigeria, Ivory Coast and Ghana (there are no farmer unions in Cameroon)
  5. Interviewed FAIRTRADE representatives in the Netherlands
  6. Perused FAIRTRADE annual reports
  7. Built a price-line per bar of chocolate from consumer to farmer
  8. Built on previous research and publications on the topic.

Stuck in a FAIRTRADE labyrinth

Frédéric Doua (39), owner of a 4-hectare cocoa farm in Assoumoukro in the north of the worlds’ largest cocoa producing country Ivory Coast , regrets having joined the local FAIRTRADE cooperative UIREVI four years ago.  Ever since, his harvest often sits in warehouses, waiting for the occasional FAIRTRADE buyer to come along. “This is not what I was promised”, he says. “I was told that if I concentrated on cocoa, exclusively, and produced a lot of it, I would get higher prices and welfare premiums. But what happened is that I became overly dependent on cocoa prices and FAIRTRADE buyers. Whereas I used to grow food crops for my family’s consumption together with my cocoa trees, now I have to use my harvest income to buy food. Paying my childrens’ school fees is becoming difficult.”

Doua’s neighbour in Amoussoukro, Arnaud Kassi, explains that, as a member of a FAIRTRADE-certified cooperative, one ‘cannot sell beans outside the FAIRTRADE circuit’. His harvest now often forcibly waits in the warehouses. Kassi, owner of a 3.5-hectares cocoa plantation, feels he has been “trapped” in what he describes as a ‘FAIRTRADE labyrinth’, adding that it angers him that he has to wait for months before he can collect his harvest money at the cooperative that is FAIRTRADE’s formal partner.  

Though Kassi feels that he does benefit from the occasionally paid ‘FAIRTRADE Premium’ bonus, he says the amount is so small and takes so long to be paid, that this benefit becomes negligible. “The bonus money is paid to us in one go, during a year-end ceremony organised by the co-op”, says Kassi. “But it takes long before it reaches us. We have family to look after and kids to send to school. We borrow cash from people we know, but we have to pay them interest.  By the time the bonus falls in our hands, our personal debts have risen so much that the final payment hardly lessens the pain.”  Doua adds:  “Two-thirds of the premium goes to the cooperative’s leadership anyway.”

Kwesi Agyei, a peasant cocoa farmer in Atwima Mponua in Ghana’s Ashanti region, is a member of the local FAIRTRADE cooperative Kuapa Kokoo, but says he has never heard of a phenomenon called FAIRTRADE.  He believes that the extra one dollar (US$ 1.00) which he receives from Kuapa Kokoo every now and then is a gift from the Kuapa Kokoo leadership.  He is not aware that FAIRTRADE advertises worldwide with impressive-sounding benefits such as minimum prices, bonuses and community projects. Eleven other farmers, randomly picked among the Ashanti region’s sellers to the FAIRTRADE channel of the Kuapa Kokoo cooperative, professed, when interviewed, to be equally in the dark, even though they all paid a dollar in FAIRTRADE membership fees to the cooperative. 

The FAIRTRADE-partnered cooperatives promise farmers the much-vaunted FAIRTRADE bonus as a reward for joining. In this way the cooperative obtains more and more cocoa, which it can sell both to FAIRTRADE  and non-FAIRTRADE buyers. The higher the percentage of FAIRTRADE cocoa it can sell, the better, since the cooperative then obtains more premium.  Nevertheless it is beneficial for the cooperative leadership to sell large amounts of beans to buyers in general, simply because the bigger it is, the more bargaining power it has.

In Ghana too, the advantages that the farmers are said to obtain from the cooperatives, are disputed. In a documentary broadcast by Dutch chocolate importer and journalist Teun van der Keuken in 2007, a Kuapa Kokoo cooperative administrator frankly admits that many farmers refuse to become members of Kuapa Kokoo because ‘the membership fee is higher than the premium they get”, (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z202CnEvaA8).

Meanwhile, it is fast becoming more and more difficult for small farmers to stay independent. Kuapa Kokoo and the other co-ops are becoming bigger and bigger; the demand for certified cocoa from cooperatives increases daily. The eight Kuapa Kokoo farmers interviewed for this investigation had all paid membership fees  (of US$ 1.00) because it made sense to them to pool their resources as a cooperative, even if this meant having to adhere to FAIRTRADE rules. (Once you are a Fair Trade producing farmer, your farming has to be up to FAIRTRADE standards: no children in your family are allowed to help in the fields, even if this diminishes the family’s harvest and income; if you employ outside help you have to pay a minimum wage; there are also rules regarding the use of pesticides, fertilizers and farming methods.3 See also: “Is it child labour or family labour?” elsewhere in this report.)

The dominance of the cooperatives is starting to become apparent in Ivory Coast, where village-based family businesses have no option but to join them, sell to them, or turn to shady peddlers to sell their crops at even lower prices. “I would like to sell to big buyers like the cooperatives do”, says Albert Yao, who owns a two –hectare cocoa plantation in Daloa, close to the KAVOKIVA cooperative in Ivory Coast. “But they only buy products that come from certified cocoa plantations. I am not certified.  Where will I get money to survive and take care of my family if I don’t sell my crops?” Rather than become a subject of the cooperatives, Yao would like to keep his independence and become certified in his own right.  But that is not possible, since FAIRTRADE does not certify individual farmers, only cooperatives. Yao: “The FAIRTRADE system strengthens the power of cooperatives to the detriment of the small cocoa producers”.

The chairman does not travel for pleasure

The cocoa sale price in the region differs, but this is mainly dependent on middlemen and infrastructure. At the time of publication of this dossier, the world market price for cocoa fluctuated around US$ 2.40 per kilogramme. Local costs like transport and middlemen take up around US$1.00 per kilogramme, sometimes more: it depends on how long it takes to get the beans to the harbour or the processing plant. If you farm at the end of a bad road in Cameroon or Ivory Coast, you may get as little as US$ 1.00 per kilogramme;  if you are lucky enough to live close to the harbour, with a decent transport arrangement at hand, you could make US$ 1.60 per kilogramme or even a bit more. There is no difference between FAIRTRADE and ‘normal’ cocoa buyers in this respect. FAIRTRADE does guarantee a ‘minimum price’ of US$ 2.00 per kilogramme, but this price has been below the world market price for years now 4.

Therefore, the only advantage in selling to FAIRTRADE is the so-called premium or bonus, which is US$200 per tonne, or 20 US cents per kilogramme. This money is paid by the companies that buy FAIRTRADE certified cocoa, and does not go to individual farmers, but to the FAIRTRADE cooperative. FAIRTRADE stipulates that members of the cooperative should democratically decide how the premium is spent, but in practice, our interviews with farmers show, the leaders simply occasionally disburse a marginal amount to the individual farmers, who think the small hand-outs are gifts. In the case of Kuapa Kokoo, between 75 and 100 percent of the premium that a farmer earns on his harvest, flows back to the cooperative.

The cooperative pays for the yearly audit, which can cost up to US$ 8,000. The cooperative then pays for its own travel expenditure, meetings and other management costs. Only after that does the cooperative provide for  ‘welfare projects’ for the community. 

Christiana Ohene-Agyare, president of Kuapa Kokoo in Ghana, says that the cooperative is proud of the ‘many benefits to our farming communities’ that have been provided. She mentions a structure for a school building -that is not actually a school, since there are no teachers or teaching material- , several bore-holes and warehouses for storing cocoa beans on the cooperative.  Most of the money has, however, been invested in a multi-complex building in Ghana’s second largest city Kumasi. “We will rent this out and that will bring more revenue to the organisation”, Ohene-Agyare says. She also refers to apprenticeship programmes and a micro-credit scheme.

Kuapa Kokoo member farmers like Kwesi Agyei, however, have no knowledge of either a school project, training opportunities or credit facilities. “I would like access to small loans”, says Kwesi Agyei. “But there is no such opportunity at Kuapa Kokoo. On the contrary, they sometimes don’t even pay me on time. Then I get into debt.” The late payments worry him and other farmers a lot, since they don’t have the cash flow to allow for debts, let alone interest payments.

At the FAIRTRADE certified cooperative KAVOKIVA, about 250 km from Yakassé Attobrou, in Gonaté, Ivory Coast, the situation is similar. The Cooperative Agricole KAVOKIVA de Daloa unites more than 5,000 cocoa farmers, leads the cocoa sector in the area and is FAIRTRADE certified since 2004, with a potential production capacity of about 17,000 tonnes of cocoa beans.    

Here, not one farmer openly challenges chairman Fulgence N’Guessans’ claims that through FAIRTRADE, his cooperative leadership has brought many benefits. N’Guessan, a speaker at FAIRTRADE conferences around the world, likes to mention them a lot: a primary school, a clinic, hand pumps for water, a literacy programme for women.  However, privately and anonymously, farmers dispute what he says. The pumps are broken, they say, and no one is coming to repair them, just like no one came to maintain them when they were new. The same goes for two out of three wells. The ambulance bought with FAIRTRADE money has been out of service almost from the start, they add. Yet, with a production capacity of 17,000 tonnes, KAVOKIVA, -using a low estimate of  20 percent FAIRTRADE sales-,  could have sold around 3,400 tonnes of FAIRTRADE cocoa in 2010, netting US$ 680, 000 in premiums.

The farmers privately say they would prefer that the cooperative use the money for improvements in infrastructure, like roads, so more buyers can be reached. They also have ideas about irrigation. “Handpumps don’t help. We need a watertower. The Chairman should rather invest our money in such a project”, said Kouassi Soro* (28). But Soro and others hardly get to talk to Fulgence N’Guessan. Fellow farmer Issa Kalou(36)*: “Chairman N’Guessan travels to attend international conferences on agriculture and the economy. But we don’t see results from those conferences. For all we know, he could be going shopping.” And a colleague adds: “Ever since the cooperative opened an office in Abidjan, he has been living there.”

When asked for comment, N’Guessan retorted that he did not ‘travel for pleasure’, and claimed that, in the region, many more children were going to school than ‘in the past’, adding that ‘people who criticise me should remember that’. He could, however, not say how access to education had improved in the region, or whether such improvement, if any, had taken place thanks to KAVOKIVA.

The same picture of doubtful ‘community benefits’ emerges at the UIREVI cooperative in Ivory Coast. UIREVI’s FAIRTRADE premium for 2010 amounted to US $ 108,539. According to UIREVI’s books 60 percent of this money went to ‘economic consolidation’, conferences and managers’ meetings (see graph 2). Another 17 percent of UIREVI premium income was spent on ‘health care’ and ‘school kits’ for farmers’ children. But interviews with farming families revealed that the ‘school kits’ consisted of little more than a bit of paper and a pencil. Regarding the health care budget item, farmers said they did not know what this referred to.

The UIREVI Board refused to comment on the use of the FAIRTRADE premium and stated that “all farmers approved meetings and other projects at the annual general meeting”, and that “everything was done in a democratic way”.

This is also the stock response of FAIRTRADE itself, when asked about the use of premium moneys in the cooperatives it works with.  “The cooperative holds an annual general meeting of all members each year, and the use of the premium money is democratically decided by the people themselves”, says Jochum Veerman of the Max Havelaar Foundation, the institution that allocates the FAIRTRADE label to companies in the Netherlands, echoing the response that Dutch filmmaker Teun van der Keuken received.

The inference of the FAIRTRADE stock response is that if ‘people themselves’ in those far-away regions don’t know how to manage their own democratic decision making, that is their problem, and not FAIRTRADE’s.  However, by insisting that small farmers join cooperatives, FAIRTRADE inadvertently aggravates existing problems of exploitation and abuse by traditional big cocoa bosses, especially in Ivory Coast, where traditional big cocoa bosses are kingpins in a network commonly referred to as the ‘cocoa mafia’.5  Farmers interviewed in Ivory Coast all without exception confirmed that the ‘most powerful big farmers’ in a region, often somehow end up as the ‘democratically elected’ management in the cooperative. After all, it is they who produce the most cocoa, command the networks, have the best mobile phone connections, the properly equipped offices, speak the necessary western languages, and -very important for the yearly audits-, employ bookkeepers and accountants.

The small farmer may formally have a democratic right to question the cooperative’s chairman at the annual general meeting, but if you know what is good for you in Ivory Coast, you will definitely not make him angry.  Ousmane Attai, an Abidjan-based commodities specialist and expert in the cocoa sector explains that many farmers in Ivory Coast are both illiterate and used to exploitation. “They don’t understand the FAIRTRADE agreements. They are used to a situation where the officials are rich, and that these can choose who to share their wealth with. They are grateful for whatever crumbs they get, since they don’t know the concept of bonuses or premiums, let alone that they have a right to those.” In the words of another expert, Ivorian sociologist Oumar Silue: “How do you expect people to contest a representative who is at the same time a traditional authority and an elder in their context,” especially if that traditional authority and elder is also the flagship face of the growing, increasingly important FAIRTRADE channel, the partner of all the big buyers?

“We all get a percentage, but we don’t know of what”

On paper, the case for FAIRTRADE, and a partnership between FAIRTRADE and membership-based cooperatives, seems like a good one.  After all, the West African countries where the raw cocoa resource is grown, all suffer from state mismanagement and corruption, and exploitation of individual farmers by multinational buyers as well as local middlemen. FAIRTRADE was originally intended as a response to these problems. But, as seen above, a partner cooperative is not a fair, transparent, democratic institution simply because an outside partner wants it to be. Power relations, hierarchies and (functioning or faulty) management structures are features of the entire country, and to think one can, from the outside, encourage differently functioning ‘islands’ within a society hardly seems realistic.

Two years ago in Konye, South-West Cameroon, 305 small farmers who were sick of exploitation by corrupt government officials and middlemen jointly indebted themselves  to an extent of US$ 6,000 to pay for the FAIRTRADE certificate and formed the KONAFCOOP cooperative.  Since then, according to KONAFCOOP manager Asek Zachee, the cooperative has received US$ 12,000 in premiums. But Zachee falls quiet when asked how much of that money has gone to individual farmers. “They receive 25 percent”, he says, but doesn’t explain how the percentage is calculated: over what amount, what period, and whether this is per individual farmer or for the collective? “I’ll look it up in the papers and get back to you” he says.

Reverend Okie Ewang Joseph, both an elder in the community, a friend of Zachee and a member of KONAFCOOP, professes to be happy with a training of village elders that was given by the cooperative. Standing together, both men explain that the training was useful. “Knowing the techniques of maintaining and building your farm makes you spend less money on inputs and enables you to generate more. We have also started seeing other benefits through integrated cooperative management.” But Zachee adds that money in general is still very slow: “We have only sold 100 tonnes of our beans abroad since we became affiliated to FAIRTRADE two years ago.”

The amount sold by KONAFCOOP does not seem to tally with the total received premium, according to Zachee, of US$ 12,000. A sale of 100 tonnes, at a premium (over normal harvest payment) of US$ 200 per tonne, would add up to US$ 20,000. Quizzed about the exact premium income, the part of the premium income that went to individual farmers, the part that was used to pay off the debt to FAIRTRADE for the initial audit and certification and the part that was invested in the training project, Zachee repeats: “I will check my papers and get back to you”. But in the next days, weeks and months, the KONAFCOOP manager does not answer his phone.

To survive, KONAFCOOP needs to produce more and find more buyers, and that’s not easy. FAIRTRADE disclaims any responsibility for finding buyers for those who join their cooperatives, even if they pay the substantial  certification fee 6.  

“Cooperatives become middlemen just like the officials and the buying agents”

As explained earlier, FAIRTRADE did not come out of nowhere. It was an intervention, thought up 20 years ago by international trade and political structures, as a (partial) solution to a very real problem: low prices for natural resources, poverty in the countries that grow most of such resources, exploitation and corruption in these (mostly developing) countries. Saying that FAIRTRADE has not helped much, does not mean that the original problem has ceased to exist. It is still there. 

Take Cameroon.  Instead of receiving government help, the cocoa farmer in this country is faced with extortion both from officials and middlemen. Firstly, the government officials tasked with conducting agricultural programmes, which include free distribution of seedlings, implements and tractors, do not extend these for free, but demand payment.  Ayuk Orock, a Barombi-based young graduate, who has been more or less forced into cocoa farming because of lack of employment even for certified academics in Cameroon, has paid 50 US cents each for ‘free’ seedlings. “Sometimes even after paying for them, you don’t get them. The officials don’t issue receipts, so you can’t prove your case,” he says. 

‘Free’ farming tools, when they are given, can disappear as soon as they materialise. “It is not uncommon here to see a huge truck bring in machetes, shovels, digging tools, wheel-barrows and chemicals one day from Yaounde, and see the same truck carrying them back to the other side of the Mungo (Francophone Cameroon) the following day, where they disappear into individual farms”,  Nnoko Clement, a farmer from Kwa-Kwa, reports.

At harvest time, the farmers’ bags of cocoa beans are bought up, often for a pittance, by ‘Licensed Buying Agents’ with faulty weighing machines and take-it-or-leave-it offers. The Licensed Buying Agents, or LBA’s for short, travel around buying cocoa directly from the farm, then sell to processing factories –or directly to Europe- at a big mark-up.  Veteran farmer Dat Williams, who owns large family cocoa farms in Meme, the ‘cocoa centre’ of Cameroon: “They end up indebting the farmer. They sometimes pay in advance for yet to be harvested crop, not in money, but by way of chemicals and other farm inputs. These items are, however, sold very expensively, at times at more than three to five times the equivalent of local market prices”. Williams believes that ‘there is now practically no farmer who is not indebted to the LBA’s.”

“When you have nowhere else to go to get money with which to pay for the education of your children, you have no option but to accept the Shylock terms of LBA’s”, confirms Essambe Joseph, a farmer in Kumba.  “The harvesting season begins in October but schools reopen in September so when school is reopening and you have no money with which to send your children to school, the LBA’s come in handy and propose cash advances, repayment of which is eventually done in kind with cocoa beans, the value of which can be several times above the amount you received from the LBA.”

Many LBA’s are companies headed by individuals who landed in these positions overnight, with no visible income or collateral, but who are friends or relatives of government officials. Consequently farmers view the interruption, a few years ago, of a government information service in Cameroon that kept farmers up to date on the current world market price of cocoa, with suspicion: farmers’ ignorance of world market prices now plays straight into the hands of the LBA’s.  “If we were to have information on current prices, we would be able to bargain for better prices for our produce”, says Ayuk Orock.  “How do you insist on selling a kilogramme for US$2.00 when the LBA tells you the prevailing market price is US$1.50 and you have no way of knowing the truth in order to stand your ground?”

When asked for comment, the National Prices Marketing Board (NPMB) of Cameroon reacts with indignation. “What do people want the government to do? When it regulated trade in the produce sector, it was accused of heavy-handedness and centralised control unhealthy in a market economy. Now it has removed government control and you people still complain. What is it that people really want in the end?” a senior official at the NPMB headquarters in Douala asks. The ‘people’ would probably want the state machinery to work as it should, with acceptable salaries for officials doing acceptable jobs. But in Cameroon, as in Nigeria and most other West African countries, the system doesn’t work that way.

Officials at the Department of Agriculture routinely deny any corruption. A civil servant of the seed multiplication centre (CCSP) in Kumba, on the allegations regarding the sale by officials of seedlings and implements, demanded to know if the source had ‘anything by way of proof to substantiate his allegations’.  Asked how the farmers can prove this if the officials did not issue receipts, the official insisted that the accusations were ‘in bad taste.’  Another official tried to dismiss farmers complaints about theft of ‘free’ implements, saying that there were ‘public ceremonies whereby farm implements are handed over for free for everybody to see’.  But such ceremonies are few and far between, and only involve a small number of tools and villagers.

It is because of these experiences that FAIRTRADE came into being. They are also the reason that the farmers in Konye village have pinned their hopes on forming a cooperative and dealing directly with FAIRTRADE and a German buyer. But the cooperative, to date, has not given them any implements, or even information about market prices, either.  Dat Williams is not hopeful.  “Cooperatives generally do not have a good reputation. People’s harvests were in the past collected by cooperatives who promised to come and pay later. Some farmers are still being owed by cooperatives which have since gone into liquidation,” he explains his reasons for wanting to continue alone.  In his view, cooperatives and their leadership always become ‘just another middleman’ and don’t provide a long term solution to the problems of infrastructure and exploitation.

“The entire system is not fair, and an institution that perpetuates it can hardly call itself fair”

If FAIRTRADE does not really change the lives of small farmers in West Africa; if all that the small farmer gets is a little handout and a not-too-long-lasting water pump every once in a while, is this really enough benefit to justify the large amounts of money paid by Western consumers to the FAIRTRADE institution?  Alternatively, is there no other, better way to improve the lives of small cocoa farmers in West Africa?

Ousmane Attai, the commodities specialist in Abidjan, believes there is a way to do this. “The only solution is to pay better prices for harvests.  The buyers, whether FAIRTRADE certified or not, and the export companies should do better. They say they follow open market prices. But what they pay is derisory.” Attai suspects certified beans buyers of “working underground in cahoots with crooked businessmen to keep the average price low”. (An executive at the Cargill office in Abidjan, who refused to be named, rejected such suspicions, saying: “We have to support many costs”.)

Earlier in 2012, Germain Banny, Chairman of the Union Nationale des Producteurs Agricoles de Côte d’Ivoire (UNAPACI), Ivory Coasts’  farmers union,  exasperated by what he described as ‘cheating on price’, called on cocoa farmers to stop selling their beans for a ‘ridiculous price’. The strike was short-lived; farmers restarted selling their beans when they ran out of cash.  Would the ending have been different if the union and striking farmers had received international support?

Collective bargaining by farmers has already brought some improvements in Ghana, though not in the relatively little unionised cocoa sector.  On the banana plantations, the Ghanaian Agricultural Workers’ Union (GAWU) has achieved improvements ever since it started monitoring the practices of the multinational corporations. Wherever FAIRTRADE applies, they also monitor the use of premium moneys. These have now financed mutual funds and health insurance on some plantations.

However, the Secretary-General of GAWU, Kinsley Ofei-Nkansah , expressed serious doubts about the FAIRTRADE system itself.  “It perpetuates a system whereby Africa is only a primary producer and only receives a small amount for its raw materials.  FAIRTRADE allows a small group of people to aggregate the produce of small-holder famers without much benefit to the producers and then only gives the poor producers something that is called a ‘premium’. The entire system is not fair, and any institution that perpetuates it can hardly be considered ‘fair’”, he said, adding that the FAIRTRADE premium “really does not compare to the value that is appropriated to the exporter and the chain of retail stores”.

For Dat Williams in Cameroon, it is crucial that farmers should be empowered to know what is going on, -what prices apply, what subsidies or programmes are available-, so that they can increase their bargaining power. “Government or the relevant stakeholders in the cocoa sector should set up local radio stations to disseminate information to farmers on market prices, appropriate chemicals to be used during farming seasons and the necessary inputs.” “If”, he says, “this information is broadcast to farmers in their local languages, it will help empower them to squarely face predatory middlemen”. All cocoa veterans and experts interviewed concurred that only more ‘power’ to the farmers themselves, be it through income or information, or preferably both, would help them to grow their businesses and confidently school all their children.

*Where a name is indicated with an asterisk, this name has been changed at the request of the interviewee.

=======

[FR]

L’arnaque du chocolat de FairTrade

* De Selay Kouassi (Côte d’Ivoire), Chief Bisong Etahoben (Cameroun), Benjamin Tetteh (Ghana), Aniefiok Udonquak (Nigéria), Bjinse Dankert et Janneke Donkerlo (Pays-Bas), Charles Rukuni (chef d’équipe), Evelyn Groenink (rédacteur)

Dans un projet transnational de six mois mené par le Forum des journalistes d’investigation africains (FAIR), des journalistes venant de Côte d’Ivoire, du Ghana, du Cameroun, du Nigéria et des Pays-Bas ont étudié les prétendus avantages reçus par les producteurs de cacao en Afrique de l’Ouest par l’intermédiaire de la marque FAIRTRADE. 

Leurs conclusions sont choquantes: Même si le consommateur de chocolat en Occident paie une importante majoration pour le chocolat ‘honnête’,  ces avantages représentent peu ou pas d’amélioration dans la vie des cultivateurs de cacao.  Dans certains cas, en raison de la domination croissante des coopératives de FAIRTRADE, des agriculteurs étaient dans une situation pire qu’avant.   Le dossier complet est intitulé ‘L’arnaque du chocolat de FAIRTRADE’, et a été partiellement financé par le  Programme for African Investigative Reporters (PAIR).  L’histoire, dont certaines parties ont été déjà publiées en néerlandais, a fait grand bruit aux Pays-Bas.

Les images des cultivateurs de cacao heureux en Afrique sur le chocolat de ‘FAIRTRADE’ acheté par les consommateurs en Occident sont destinées à faire croire au consommateur que les larges sourires sont le résultat du commerce équitable réel : un soutien et un meilleur revenu.  Mais cette impression est fausse.

L’exploitation dans l’industrie du cacao en Afrique de l’Ouest continue, mais avec un nouveau venu sur la  scène: FAIRTRADE lui-même, qui bénéficie de la majoration supplémentaire payée par des consommateurs.   L’étiquette de FAIRTRADE (délivrée par la société-sœur de certification de FAIRTRADE, Flo-Cert), saluée il y a vingt ans comme une institution innovatrice qui permettrait d’améliorer les conditions de vie des agriculteurs dans l’industrie du cacao en Afrique de l’Ouest, n’a pas été à la hauteur de ses promesses.  Des agriculteurs qui vendent à travers le circuit de FAIRTRADE:

·         Ne reçoivent pas plus de revenus pour leurs récoltes que les agriculteurs « ordinaires » ;

·         Ne sont pas tenus au courant des prix du marché mondial du cacao par les coopératives de FAIRTRADE qui sont censées les rendre autonomes ;

·         Reçoivent peu ou pas de bénéfices des primes versées aux coopératives de FAIRTRADE des fonds supplémentaires de FAIRTRADE payés par les consommateurs ;

·         N’ont pas été souvent informés comment, ou même que, FAIRTRADE est censé leur être utile ;

·         Sont parfois évincés de l’agriculture dans les zones où les coopératives de FAIRTRADE sont devenues dominantes.

 

En outre, en Côte d’Ivoire, des individus dans la fameuse ‘mafia du cacao’  sont devenus des chevilles ouvrières en tant que partenaires dans les coopératives de FAIRTRADE.  Au Ghana, où FAIRTRADE a établi des liens étroits avec le Conseil de cacao (COCOBOD), des experts agricoles se plaignent que le modèle FAIRTRADE perpétue le système de commerce traditionnel ‘inéquitable’ selon lequel l’agriculteur demeure au bas de l’échelle.

De manière plus poignante, les statistiques de FAIRTRADE montrent que la partie qui gagne le plus d’argent grâce au cacao du commerce équitable est FAIRTRADE lui-même. Le titulaire de la marque FAIRTRADE aux Pays-Bas, la Fondation Max Havelaar, gagne 6 cents US de chaque barre de chocolat FAIRTRADE de 2,50 $ US.  Par contre, le “supplément” FAIRTRADE versé aux coopératives ouest-africaines à partir de la même barre de chocolat ne s’élève qu’à 2,5 cents US (voir le graphique 1).   C’est ce qui ressort également des rapports annuels de Max Havelaar.  Un exemple: l’organisme certificateur FAIRTRADE a gagné 416 618 Euro (environ 520 000 $US) à partir des redevances (qui leur sont versées par les entreprises de chocolat pour le droit d’utilisation du logo FAIRTRADE) en 2009, tandis que moins de la moitié de ce montant (175 000 Euro ou 218 750 $US) a été versée aux coopératives de producteurs de cacao FAIRTRADE pendant cette année-là.

Ce sont les résultats d’une enquête transnationale de six mois menée par des journalistes du Forum des journalistes d’investigation africains (www.fairreporters.net) en Côte d’Ivoire, au Cameroun, au Ghana et au Nigéria avec des collègues aux Pays-Bas et soutenus par le Programme for African Investigative Reporting (PAIR).

Cette enquête journalistique complète sur les promesses et les pratiques de FAIRTRADE porte sur toute la région productrice de cacao en Afrique de l’Ouest.  Elle a été entreprise après la première enquête menée par Selay Kouassi, membre de l’équipe en Côte d’Ivoire, sur FAIRTRADE et d’autres activités de certification générales dans le secteur du cacao en Côte d’Ivoire. Après la première publication sur ce sujet, Kouassi a reçu un certain nombre d’appels téléphoniques menaçants et a dû se cacher.  Plusieurs de ses sources étaient également menacées. 

Les menaces étaient la raison pour laquelle FAIR s’est lancé dans une enquête à l’échelle régionale sur le même sujet, en conformité avec le ‘principe Arizona’ (1) selon lequel une enquête doit être étendue et approfondie dès qu’un/e journaliste qui a initialement étudié l’histoire se rend compte qu’il/elle est menacé(e).  Le message Arizona est: On peut faire taire un journaliste, mais on ne peut pas tuer une histoire.  Cette enquête sur les promesses et les pratiques de FAIRTRADE est donc un projet Arizona. (Pour une référence sur l’origine du nom ‘projet Arizona’, cliquez ici : http://legacy.ire.org/history/arizonaproject.html.)

Il est, cependant, important de souligner qu’il n’est pas clairement établi de laquelle des coopératives  dans le secteur lucratif du cacao en Côte d’Ivoire que proviennent les menaces dont  Kouassi et ses sources ont fait l’objet (2).   Cette enquête se concentre exclusivement sur le label FAIRTRADE car c’est le  seul qui promet un meilleur revenu pour le cultivateur de cacao.  C’était cette promesse qui a été mise à l’épreuve et qui s’est avérée être, pour la plupart, fausse.  C’était également l’argument principal dans l’ouvrage antérieur de Kouassi.

Pour l’enquête, l’équipe a :

1.       Visité des dizaines de plantations de cacao et des coopératives, et a interviewé plus de 70 cultivateurs de cacao en Côte d’Ivoire, au Ghana, au Cameroun et au Nigéria (associés ou non associés à FAIRTRADE)

2.       Interviewé des représentants, et a examiné des documents avec soin, des coopératives de FAIRTRADE  en Côte d’Ivoire, au Ghana et au Cameroun.

3.       Accédé aux statistiques et aux documents gouvernementaux en Côte d’Ivoire, au Ghana, au Cameroun et au Nigéria

4.       Interviewé des représentants de syndicats agricoles au Nigéria, en Côte d’Ivoire et au Ghana (il n’y a pas de syndicats agricoles au Cameroun)

5.       Interviewé des représentants de FAIRTRADE aux Pays-Bas.

6.       Etudié des rapports annuels de FAIRTRADE

7.       Etabli un prix par barre de chocolat du consommateur à l’agriculteur

8.      Mis à profit des recherches et des publications antérieures sur le sujet.

 

Piégé dans un labyrinthe FAIRTRADE

Frédéric Doua (39), propriétaire d’une plantation de cacao de 4 hectares à Assoumoukro dans le nord du premier producteur mondial de cacao, la Côte d’Ivoire, regrette d’avoir rejoint la coopérative locale de FAIRTRADE, UIREVI, il y a quatre ans.  Depuis, sa récolte reste souvent dans des entrepôts en attendant que l’acheteur occasionnel de FAIRTRADE se présente.  « Ce n’est pas ce qu’on m’a promis » dit-il.  « On m’a dit que si je me concentrais sur le cacao, exclusivement, en produisais beaucoup, j’obtiendrais des prix plus élevés et des primes.  Mais ce qui s’est passé, c’est que je dépendais trop des prix du cacao et des acheteurs de FAIRTRADE.  Autrefois je cultivais des cultures vivrières pour la consommation de ma famille ainsi que le cacao, maintenant je dois utiliser le revenu de ma récolte pour acheter de la nourriture.  Payer les frais scolaires de mes enfants devient de plus en plus difficile. »

Le voisin de Doua à Amoussoukro, Arnaud Kassi, explique que, en tant que membre d’une coopérative certifiée de FAIRTRADE, on ‘ne peut pas vendre des fèves en dehors du circuit de FAIRTRADE’.  Maintenant sa récolte doit attendre souvent dans les entrepôts.   Kassi, propriétaire d’une plantation de cacao de 3,5 hectares estime qu’il a été « piégé » dans ce qu’il décrit comme un « labyrinthe FAIRTRADE », ajoutant qu’il se fâche quand il doit attendre des mois avant de pouvoir récupérer son argent pour la récolte au siège de la coopérative qui est le partenaire officiel de FAIRTRADE.

Bien que Kassi estime qu’il bénéficie de temps en temps d’une « prime FAIRTRADE », il dit que le montant est si petit et il met si longtemps pour être payé, que cet avantage devient négligeable. « La prime nous est versée d’un seul coup, lors d’une cérémonie de fin d’année organisée par la coopérative », dit Kassi. « Mais il faut attendre longtemps avant qu’elle nous parvienne.  Il faut s’occuper de la famille etde la scolarité des enfants.  Nous empruntons du liquide aux personnes que nous connaissons, mais il faut payer les intérêts.  Au moment où la prime nous tombe entre les mains, nos dettes personnelles ont tellement augmenté que le paiement final n’attenue guère la douleur ».  Doua ajoute : « Les deux tiers de la prime va à la direction de la coopérative de toute façon. 

 Kwesi Agyei, un cultivateur de cacaoà Atwima Mponua dans la région Ashanti au Ghana, est membre de la coopérative locale de FAIRTRADE, Kuapa Kokoo, mais il dit qu’il n’a jamais entendu parler d’un phénomène « FAIRTRADE ».  Il croit que le supplément d’un dollar (1,00 $ US) qu’il reçoit de temps en temps de Kuapa Kokoo est un cadeau de la direction de Luapa Kokoo.    Il n’est pas conscient du fait que FAIRTRADE fait de la publicité dans le monde entier pour des avantages impressionnants tels que des prix minimum, des primes et des projets communautaires.  Onze autres cultivateurs, choisis au hasard parmi les vendeurs de la région Ashanti au réseau FAIRTRADE de la coopérative Kuapa Kokoo, ont déclaré, lors d’une interview, qu’ils étaient également dans le noir, bien qu’ils aient payé un dollar pour les frais d’adhésion « FAIRTRADE » à la coopérative

Bien qu’un cultivateur puisse vendre du cacao “ordinaire” et non-identifié à une coopérative sans en être membre, des coopératives de FAIRTRADE encouragent les petits agriculteurs à devenir membres, de sorte que leur cacao peut faire partie de la chaîne du cacao étiqueté de FAIRTRADE.  Les coopératives qui se sont associées à FAIRTRADE promettent aux cultivateurs la prime tant vantée de FAIRTRADE en récompense de leur adhésion.   Mais, au Ghana aussi, les avantages de cette prime sont contestés. Dans un documentaire réalisé par l’importateur de chocolat et journaliste hollandais Teun van der Keuken en 2007 2004, un administrateur de coopérative Kuapa Kokoo avoue franchement que de nombreux agriculteurs refusent d’être membres de Kuapa Kokoo parce que « les frais d’adhésion sont plus élevés que la primes qu’ils reçoivent », (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z202CnEvaA8).

D’un autre côté, il devient de plus en plus difficile pour les petits agriculteurs de rester indépendants.  Kuapa Kokoo et les autres coopératives deviennent de plus en plus puissantes ;  la demande de cacao certifié des coopératives augmente chaque jour.  Les 12 agriculteurs de Kuapa Kokoo, interviewés pour la présente enquête avaient tous payé les frais d’adhésion (de 1,00 $ US) parce qu’il paraissait logique de combiner leurs ressources comme une coopérative, même si cela impliquait qu’ils devaient se conformer aux règles de FAIRTRADE.  (Une fois que vous êtes producteur de FAIRTRADE, votre production doit se conformer aux normes de FAIRTRADE: les enfants de votre famille ne sont pas autorisés à aider dans les champs même si cela réduit la récolte et le revenue de la famille; si vous embauchez une aide extérieure il faut payer un salaire minimum ; il y a aussi des règles concernant l’utilisation des pesticides, des engrais et des méthodes agricoles. (3) Voir aussi: “Est-ce qu’il s’agit du travail des enfants ou du travail familial?” dans le présent rapport.)

La même domination des coopératives commence à se manifester en Côte d’Ivoire où les entreprises familiales basées dans les villages n’ont pas d’autre choix à part rejoindre les coopératives, leur vendre, ou se tourner vers les colporteurs louches afin de vendre leur récolte à des prix encore plus bas. « Je voudrais vendre à de gros acheteurs de la même façon que les coopératives » déclare Albert Yao, qui est propriétaire d’une plantation de cacao de deux hectares à Daloa, près de la coopérative KAVOKIVA en Côte d’Ivoire. « Mais ils achètent seulement des produits provenant de plantations de cacao certifiées.  Je ne suis pas certifié.  Où est-ce que je vais trouver de l’argent pour survivre et m’occuper de ma famille si je ne vends pas ma récolte ? »  Plutôt que devenir sujet des coopératives, Yao voudrait garder son indépendance et devenir producteur certifié à part entière.  Mais ce n’est pas possible, car FAIRTRADE ne certifie pas de producteurs individuels, seulement des coopératives.  D’après Yao: « Le système FAIRTRADE renforce le pouvoir des coopératives au détriment des petits producteurs de cacao.

Le président ne voyage pas pour le plaisir

Le prix de vente du cacao dans la région diffère mais cela dépend principalement des intermédiaires et des infrastructures.  Au moment de la publication de ce dossier, le prix du marché mondial du cacao a varié autour de 2,40 $US par kilogramme.  Des frais locaux tels que les transports et les intermédiaires représentent environ 1 $US par kilogramme, parfois plus: Cela dépend de combien de temps il faut pour transporter les fèves au port ou à l’usine de transformation.  Si votre plantation se trouve au bout d’une route en mauvais état au Cameroun ou en Côte d’Ivoire, il se peut que vous receviez aussi peu que 1 $ US par kilogramme; si vous aviez la chance de vivre près du port avec un bon système de transport à portée de main, vous pourriez gagner 1,60 $US par kilogramme ou même un peu plus. Il n’y a pas de différence entre des acheteurs de cacao FAIRTRADE et des acheteurs de cacao ‘ordinaires’ à cet égard.  FAIRTRADE garantit un ‘prix minimum’ de 2 $US par kilogramme, mais ce prix est inférieur au prix du marché mondial depuis des années (4).

Par conséquent, le seul avantage de la vente à FAIRTRADE est la soi-disant prime qui est de 200 $US par tonne, ou 20 cents US par kilogramme.  Cet argent est payé par les entreprises qui achètent du cacao certifié FAIRTRADE, et ne va pas à des producteurs individuels mais à la coopérative FAIRTRADE.  FAIRTRADE stipule que les membres de la coopérative doivent décider démocratiquement de la façon dont la prime est dépensée, mais dans la pratique, nos entretiens avec les agriculteurs montrent que, de temps en temps,  les leaders déboursent un montant insignifiant aux agriculteurs individuels qui pensent que les petits dons sont des cadeaux.  Dans le cas de Kuapa Kokoo, entre 75 et 100 pour cent de la prime qu’un agriculteur gagne sur sa récolte revient à la coopérative. 

La direction de la coopérative paie pour la certification initiale et la vérification annuelle: ces fonds affluent immédiatement vers FAIRTRADE. (Le coût de la certification peut varier de 1 000 $US jusqu’à plusieurs fois ce montant;  la vérification annuelle de FAIRTRADE peut s’élever à 8 000 $US).  La coopérative paie alors ses frais de déplacement, des réunions et d’autres frais de gestion. C’est seulement après cela que la coopérative offre quelques ‘projets sociaux’ à la communauté.

Christiana Ohene-Agyare, président de Kuapa Kokoo au Ghana, estime que la coopérative est fière des « nombreux avantages pour nos communautés agricoles » qui ont été fournis.   Elle fait mention d’une structure pour un bâtiment scolaire – qui n’est pas réellement une école car il n’y a pas d’enseignants ou de matériel pédagogique -, plusieurs forages et des entrepôts pour le stockage des fèves de cacao de la coopérative.  La plupart de l’argent a cependant été investi dans un bâtiment multi-complexe à Kumasi, la deuxième plus grande ville du Ghana. « Nous allons le louer pour apporter plus de revenus à l’organisation » déclare  Ohene-Agyare. Elle se réfère également aux programmes d’apprentissage et à un système de microcrédit.

Des agriculteurs membres de Kuapa Kokoo comme Kwesi Agyei, cependant, n’ont pas connaissance d’un projet d’école, de possibilités de formation ou de facilités de crédit. « J’aimerais un accès aux petits prêts » déclare Kwesi Agyei.  « Mais une telle possibilité n’existe pas à Kuapa Kokoo.  Au contraire, parfois ils ne me paient pas à temps.  Alors je m’endette ». Les retards de paiement l’inquiètent et les autres agriculteurs également, car ils n’ont pas de liquidité pour permettre les dettes, et encore moins pour payer les intérêts.

A la coopérative KAVOKIVA, à 250 km environ de Yakassé Attobrou, à Gonaté,  en Côte d’Ivoire, la situation est similaire.  La Coopérative Agricole KAVOKIVA de Daloa réunit plus de 5 000 producteurs de cacao, est en tête du secteur du cacao dans la région et est certifiée FAIRTRADE depuis 2004, avec une capacité de production d’environ 17 000 tonnes de fèves de cacao.    

Ici, pas un seul agriculteur ne conteste ouvertement les affirmations du président Fulgence N’Guessans. Selon lui,  par le biais de FAIRTRADE, sa direction de la coopérative a apporté beaucoup d’avantages.  N’Guessan, orateur lors des conférences de FAIRTRADE à travers le monde, aime beaucoup les citer: une école primaire, une clinique, des pompes à main pour l’eau, un programme d’alphabétisme pour les femmes.  Toutefois, en privé et de façon anonyme, les agriculteurs contestent ce qu’il dit.  Les pompes sont cassées, disent-ils, et personne ne vient les réparer, juste comme personne n’est venu les entretenir quand elles étaient neuves.    Il en va de même pour deux des trois puits. L’ambulance achetée avec l’argent de FAIRTRADE a été retirée du service presque dès le début, ajoutent-ils. Pourtant, avec une capacité de production de 17 000 tonnes, KAVOKIVA doit avoir vendu environ 8 000 tonnes de cacao de FAIRTRADE en 2010, rapportant 1,6 million $US en primes.

Les agriculteurs disent en privé qu’ils préféreraient que les coopératives utilisent l’argent pour l’ amélioration des infrastructures, comme les routes, afin d’atteindre plus d’acheteurs.  Ils ont également des idées sur l’irrigation.  « Des pompes à main n’aident pas.  Nous avons besoin d’un château d’eau.  Le président devrait plutôt investir notre argent dans un tel projet » a déclaré Kouassi Soro* (28). Mais Soro et les autres n’ont presque jamais l’occasion de parler à Fulgence N’Guessan. Un autre agriculteur Issa Kalou(36)*: « Le président N’Guessan voyage pour assister à des conférences internationales sur l’agriculture et l’économie.  Mais nous ne voyons pas de résultats de ces conférences.  Pour autant que nous sachions, il pourrait faire du shopping ».  Et un collègue ajoute: « Depuis que la coopérative a un bureau à Abidjan, il y habite. »

Quand on lui a demandé des commentaires, N’Guessan a rétorqué qu’il « ne voyageait pas pour le plaisir » et a affirmé que, dans la région beaucoup plus d’enfants allaient à l’école que « dans le passé ». Il a ajouté  que « les gens qui me critiquent ne devraient pas oublier cela ». Il ne pouvait cependant pasdire comment l’accès à l’éducation s’était amélioré dans la région, ou si une telle amélioration, s’il y en a, avait eu lieu grâce à KAVOKIVA.

La même image de « avantages communautaires » douteux se dessine à la coopérative UIREVI en Côte d’Ivoire.  La prime FAIRTRADE d’UIREVI pour 2010 s’est élevée à 108 539 $ US. D’après le livre de comptabilité d’UIREVI 60 pour cent de cette somme a été allouée à la « consolidation économique », des conférences et des réunions de la direction (voir le graphique 2).  17 pour cent des revenus de prime ont été consacrés aux ‘services de santé’ et ‘kits scolaires’ pour les enfants des agriculteurs.  Mais lors des entretiens il a été révélé que les ‘kits scolaires’ ne comprenaient que quelques feuilles de papier et un crayon.  En ce qui concerne le poste budgétaire des services de santé, les agriculteurs ont dit qu’ils ne savaient pas à quoi cela se référait.

Le Conseil UIREVI a refusé de commenter l’utilisation de la prime FAIRTRADE et a déclaré que «les réunions ainsi que les autres projets ont été approuvés par  tous les agriculteurs lors de l’assemblée générale annuelle », et que « tout a été fait de façon démocratique ».

C’est aussi la réponse toute faite de FAIRTRADE lorsque l’on l’interroge sur l’utilisation des fonds de prime dans les coopératives. « La coopérative tient une assemblée générale annuelle de tous les agriculteurs membres et l’utilisation des fonds de prime est décidée de façon démocratique par eux » déclare Jochum Veerman de la Fondation Max Havelaar, l’institutionbasée aux Bays-Bas, qui attribue le label FAIRTRADE aux entreprises, reprenant la réponse que le cinéaste néerlandais Teun van der Keuken a reçu en  2007 2004.

La conclusion tirée de la réponse de FAIRTRADE est que si « les gens eux-mêmes » dans ces régions lointaines ne savent pas gérer leur prise de décision démocratique, c’est leur problème et pas celui de FAIRTRADE.  Cependant, en insistant pour que les petits agriculteurs rejoignent des coopératives,  FAIRTRADE aggrave des problèmes d’exploitation et d’abus de grands patrons traditionnels du cacao, en particulier en Côte d’Ivoire, où ils sont la cheville ouvrière dans un réseau connu sous le nom de ‘mafia de cacao’.(5)    Les agriculteurs interrogés en Côte d’Ivoire ont confirmé, sans exception, que les ‘grands agriculteurs les plus puissants’ dans une région, d’une manière ou d’une autre, finissent souvent par être  ‘démocratiquement élus’ à la tête de la direction.  Après tout, ce sont eux qui produisent le plus de cacao, sont en tête des réseaux, ont les meilleures connexions de téléphone mobile, les bureaux bien équipés, parlent les langues occidentales nécessaires, et – très important pour les vérifications annuelles -, embauchent les aides comptables et les comptables.

Le petit agriculteur peut officiellement avoir le droit démocratique d’interroger le président de la coopérative lors de l’assemblée générale annuelle, mais si vous ne voulez pas vous attirer des ennuis  en Côte d’Ivoire, vous ne mettrez pas le président de la coopérative en colère.   Ousmane Attai, spécialiste des marchandises et expert dans le secteur du cacao basé à Abidjan, explique que beaucoup d’agriculteurs en Côte d’Ivoire sont analphabètes et habitués à l’exploitation. « Ils ne comprennent pas les accords de FAIRTRADE.  Ils sont habitués à une situation où les fonctionnaires sont riches, et que ceux-ci peuvent choisir avec qui ils souhaitent partager leur richesse.  Ils sont reconnaissants des miettes qu’ils reçoivent car ils ne connaissent pas le concept des primes, et encore moins qu’ils ont droit à celles-ci ».  Pour citer un autre expert, le sociologue ivoirien Oumar Silue: « Comment voulez-vous que les gens se disputent avec un représentant qui est en même temps une autorité traditionnelle et un ancien dans leur contexte, » surtout si cette autorité et cet ancien est aussi le visage phare du réseau croissant et de plus en plus important de FAIRTRADE, le partenaire de tous les grands acheteurs ?

« Nous recevons tous un pourcentage, mais nous ne savons pas de quoi »

En théorie, le cas de FAIRTRADE et un partenariat entre FAIRTRADE et des coopératives fondées sur les affiliations, semble être une bonne idée. Après tout, les pays ouest-africains où la ressource de cacao brut est cultivée, souffrent tous d’une mauvaise gestion de l’Etat et de la corruption et l’exploitation des agriculteurs par les acheteurs multinationaux ainsi que les intermédiaires locaux.  FAIRTRADE a été conçu au départ comme une réponse à ces problèmes.  Mais, comme on le voit ci-dessus, une coopérative partenaire n’est pas une institution juste, transparente, démocratique tout simplement parce qu’un partenaire externe veut qu’elle le soit.  Des relations de pouvoir, des hiérarchies et des structures de gestion (fonctionnelles ou défectueuses) sont des caractéristiques de l’ensemble du pays.  Penser qu’on peut, de l’extérieur, encourager des ‘îlots’ à fonctionner différemment  au sein d’une société ne semble guère réaliste.

Il y a deux ans à Konye, au sud-ouest du Cameroun, 305 petits agriculteurs qui en avaient marre de l’exploitation par des fonctionnaires et des intermédiaires corrompus se sont endettés conjointement à hauteur de 6 000 $ US, – afin de payer le certificat de FAIRTRADE et ont établi la coopérative KONAFCOOP. Dès lors, selon le responsable de KONAFCOOP, Asek Zachee, la coopérative a reçu 12 000 $US sous forme de primes.  Mais Zachee se tait quand on lui demande combien d’argent a été versé aux agriculteurs individuels.  « Ils reçoivent 25% », dit-il, mais n’explique pas comment le pourcentage est calculé : sur quel montant, quelle période, et est-ce que c’est par agriculteur individuel ou la coopérative ? « Je vais le vérifier dans les documents et revenir vers vous » dit-il.

Le révérend Okie Ewang Joseph, un ancien de la communauté, un ami de Zachee et membre de  KONAFCOOP, se dit satisfait de la formation que des anciens du village ont reçu de  la coopérative.  Se tenant ensemble, les deux hommes expliquent que la formation était utile.  « Connaître les techniques d’entretien et de construction de votre exploitation agricole vous permet de dépenser moins d’argent sur les intrants et de générer davantage.  Nous avons commencé à voir également d’autres avantages grâce à une gestion intégrée des coopératives. » Mais Zachee ajoute que l’argent en général est encore très lent: « Nous avons vendu seulement 100 tonnes de nos fèves à l’étranger depuis que nous sommes affiliés à FAIRTRADE il y a deux ans. »

 La quantité vendue par KONAFCOOP ne semble pas correspondre à la prime totale reçue de 12 000 $US, selon Zachee. Une vente de 100 tonnes, à une prime (sur paiement de récolte normale) de 200 $US, s’élèverait à 20 000 $US.  Interrogé sur le revenu exact de la prime, la partie de la prime qui revient aux agriculteurs individuels, la partie qui a été utilisée afin de rembourser la dette à FAIRTRADE pour la vérification initiale et la certification et la partie qui a été investie dans le projet de formation, Zachee répète : « Je vais le vérifier dans mes documents et revenir vers vous ». Mais au cours des prochains jours, des semaines et des mois le responsable de KONAFCOOP ne répond pas à son téléphone.

Pour survivre, KONAFCOOP doit produire plus et trouver plus d’acheteurs, et ce n’est pas facile. FAIRTRADE décline toute responsabilité quant à trouver des acheteurs pour ceux qui se joignent à leurs coopératives, même s’ils paient les frais de certification considérables(4). 

                                                                               

« Les coopératives deviennent des intermédiaires, juste comme les fonctionnaires et les agents d’achat »

Comme expliqué précédemment, FAIRTRADE n’est pas sorti de nulle part.  Il s’agissait d’une intervention,  inventée il y a 20 ans par le commerce international et des structures politiques, comme une solution (partielle) à un problème bien réel : des prix bas pour des ressources naturelles,  la pauvreté dans les pays qui cultivent la plupart de ces ressources, l’exploitation et la corruption dans ces pays (pour la plupart en voie de développement). Dire que FAIRTRADE n’a pas beaucoup aidé ne signifie pas que le problème a disparu.  Il existe toujours. 

Prenons l’exemple du Cameroun.  Au lieu de recevoir l’aide gouvernementale, le cultivateur de cacao est confronté  à l’extorsion des fonctionnaires et des intermédiaires.  Tout d’abord, les responsables gouvernementaux chargés de mener des programmes agricoles, qui comprennent la distribution gratuite de plants, d’outils et de tracteurs, ne les offrent pas gratuitement, mais exigent un paiement.   Ayuk Orock, un jeune diplômé basé à Barombi, qui a été plus ou moins forcé d’entrer dans la culture du cacao en raison du manque d’emploi même pour les diplômés au Cameroun, a payé 50 cents US  chacun pour des plants « gratuits ».  « Parfois, même après avoir payé, vous ne les recevez pas.  Les fonctionnaires ne donnent pas de reçus, donc vous n’avez pas de preuve du paiement » dit-il.

Des outils agricoles ‘gratuits’, quand ils sont distribués, peuvent disparaître dès qu’ils se matérialisent. « Il n’est pas rare ici de voir un gros camion qui apporte des machettes, des pelles, des outils de creusage, des brouettes et des produits chimiques de Yaounde un jour, et de voir le même camion les transportant vers l’autre côté du Mungo (le Cameroun francophone) le jour suivant, où ils disparaissent dans des exploitations agricoles individuelles » déclare Nnoko Clement, un agriculteur de Kwa-Kwa.

Au moment des récoltes, les sacs de fèves de cacao des agriculteurs sont achetés, souvent pour une bagatelle, par des ‘agents d’achat autorisés’ avec des balances défectueuses et des propositions qui sont à prendre ou à laisser.  Les agents d’achat autorisés, ou LBA’s en abrégé, se déplacent et  achètent du cacao directement dans l’exploitation agricole pour le vendre aux usines de transformation – ou directement en Europe – à un prix majoré. Agriculteur expérimenté, Dat Williams, propriétaire de grandes plantations de cacao familiales à Meme, le ‘centre du cacao’ au Cameroun déclare : « Ils finissent par endetter l’agriculteur.  Ils paient parfois à l’avance pour les cultures à être récoltées, et non pas en argent, mais par  le biais de produits chimiques et d’autres intrants agricoles. Ces articles sont, cependant, vendus à des prix élevés, parfois plus de trois à cinq fois l’équivalent du prix du marché local ».  Williams estime que « maintenant il n’y a pratiquement aucun agriculteur qui n’est endetté envers les LBA. »

« Quand vous n’avez nulle part où aller pour obtenir de l’argent afin de payer l’éducation de vos enfants, vous n’avez pas d’autre choix que d’accepter les conditions  « Shylock » des LBA » confirme Essambe Joseph, un agriculteur dans le village de Kumba. « La saison des récoltes commence en octobre mais les écoles rouvrent en septembre alors quand l’école rouvre et vous n’avez pas d’argent pour envoyer vos enfants à l’école, les LBA sont utiles et proposent des crédits de caisse, dont le remboursement est finalement en nature avec des fèves de cacao, dont la valeur peut être plusieurs fois supérieure au montant que vous avez reçu du LBA ».“

Beaucoup de LBA sont des entreprises dirigées par des individus qui se sont retrouvés dans ces positions du jour au lendemain sans revenu visible ou garantie, mais qui sont des amis ou des parents des fonctionnaires.  Par conséquent, des agriculteurs considèrent avec méfiance l’interruption, il a y quelques années, d’un service d’information du gouvernement au Cameroun qui tenait des agriculteurs au courant du prix actuel du marché mondial de cacao : l’ignorance des agriculteurs en matière de prix du marché mondial renforce la position des LBA. « Si nous avions des informations  sur des prix actuels, nous pourrions négocier de meilleurs prix pour nos produits », dit  Ayuk Orock.  « Comment pouvez-vous insister sur un prix de 2 $US par kilogramme quand le LBA indique que le prix du marché est de 1,50 $US et vous n’avez aucun moyen de savoir la vérité afin de pouvoir rester ferme quant à vos prix ? »

Quand on lui a demandé des commentaires, le National Prices Marketing Board du Cameroun réagit avec indignation « Qu’est-ce que les gens veulent que le gouvernement fasse ? Lorsqu’il a réglementé le commerce dans le secteur des produits, il a été accusé de manque de tact et de contrôle centralisé malsaine dans une économie de marché.  Maintenant il a supprimé le contrôle du gouvernement et les gens continuent à se plaindre.  Qu’est-ce que les gens veulent en fin de compte? »  demande un haut fonctionnaire au siège du NPMB à Douala. Les ‘gens’ aimeraient probablement que l’appareil d’Etat fonctionne comme il faut, avec des salaires acceptables pour des fonctionnaires qui font un travail acceptable.  Mais au Cameroun, comme au Nigéria et la plupart des pays ouest-africains, le système ne fonctionne pas de cette façon.

Des fonctionnaires du ministère de l’Agriculture démentent systématiquement toute corruption. Un fonctionnaire du centre de multiplication des semences (CCSP) à Kumba, sur les allégations relatives à la vente de semis et de matériel par des fonctionnaires voulait savoir si la source avait ‘quelque chose à titre de preuve pour justifier ses allégations’.  Il a demandé comment est-ce que les agriculteurs peuvent le prouver si les fonctionnaires n’ont pas donné de reçus et a affirmé que les allégations étaient ‘de mauvais goût’.  Un autre fonctionnaire a tenté de rejeter les réclamations des agriculteurs au sujet du vol de matériel ‘gratuit’ en disant qu’il y avait des « cérémonies publiques pendant lesquelles les outils agricoles sont remis gratuitement », Mais ces cérémonies sont rares et ne concernent qu’un petit nombre d’outils et de villageois.

C’est à cause de ces expériences que  FAIRTRADE a vu le jour.  Elles sont aussi la raison pour laquelle les agriculteurs dans le village de Konye ont mis leurs espoirs sur la création d’une coopérative pour traiter directement avec FAIRTRADE et un acheteur allemand.  Mais la coopérative, à ce jour, ne leur a pas donné d’outils, ou même des informations sur les prix du marché. Dat Williams n’est pas optimiste.        « Des coopératives ne jouissent pas généralement d’une bonne réputation.  Dans le passé les récoltes des gens étaient récupérées par les coopératives qui ont promis de payer plus tard. Certains agriculteurs  n’ont pas encore reçu leur dû auprès des coopératives qui sont en liquidation, » il explique ses raisons pour continuer seul.  A son avis, des coopératives et leur direction deviennent “juste un autre intermédiaire” et ne fournissent pas de solution à long terme aux problèmes d’infrastructure et d’exploitation.

« L’ensemble du système n’est pas équitable, et une institution qui le perpétue peut difficilement se dire équitable »

Si FAIRTRADE ne change pas vraiment la vie des petites agriculteurs in Afrique de l’Ouest; si le petit agriculteur ne reçoit qu’un petit don et une pompe à eau qui n’est pas durable de temps en temps, est-ce que c’est vraiment suffisant pour justifier les grosses sommes d’argent payées par les consommateurs occidentaux à l’institution FAIRTRADE ? Sinon, est-ce qu’il y a une meilleure façon d’améliorer la vie de petits cultivateurs de cacao en Afrique de l’Ouest?

Ousmane Attai, spécialiste des marchandises à Abidjan, croit qu’il y a un moyen de le faire. « La seule solution est de payer de meilleurs prix pour les récoltes. Les acheteurs, qu’ils soient certifiés FAIRTRADE ou non, et des sociétés export-import devraient faire mieux.  On dit qu’ils suivent des prix du marché libre.  Mais ce qu’ils paient est dérisoire. »  Attai pense que les acheteurs de fèves certifiés « travaillent dans la clandestinité et sont de mèche avec des hommes d’affaires malhonnêtes pour maintenir le prix moyen à un niveau faible. » (Un cadre au bureau de Cargill à Abidjan, qui a refusé d’être nommé, a rejeté ces soupçons, en disant : « Nous devons supporter de nombreux coûts »)

Plus tôt en 2012, Germain Banny, président de  l’Union Nationale des Producteurs Agricoles de Côte d’Ivoire (UNAPACI), le syndicat agricole en Côte d’Ivoire, qui en a marre de ce qu’il décrit comme « une fraude sur les prix », a fait appel aux cultivateurs de cacao afin qu’ils cessent de vendre leurs fèves à un « prix ridicule ». La grève a été de courte durée; les cultivateurs ont recommencé à vendre leurs fèves quand ils ont épuisé leurs liquidités. Est-ce que la fin aurait été différente si les agriculteurs du syndicat en grève avaient reçu un soutien international ?

La négociation collective des agriculteurs a déjà apporté des améliorations au Ghana, mais pas dans le secteur du cacao relativement peu syndicalisé.  Sur les plantations de bananes le Ghanaian Agricultural Workers’ Union (GAWU) a apporté des améliorations depuis qu’il a commencé à surveiller les pratiques des sociétés multinationales. Partout où FAIRTRADE s’applique, ils surveillent l’utilisation des fonds de prime.   Ceux-ci ont financé des fonds communs et l’assurance maladie sur certaines plantations.

Toutefois, le Secrétaire général de GAWU, Kinsley Ofei-Nkansah , a exprimé de sérieux doutes sur le système FAIRTRADE lui-même. « Il perpétue un système par lequel l’Afrique n’est qu’un producteur primaire et ne reçoit qu’un petit montant pour ses matières premières.  FAIRTRADE permet à un petit groupe de personnes de réunir des produits des petits agriculteurs sans grand profit aux producteurs et puis donne aux producteurs pauvres quelque chose connu sous le nom de « prime ». L’ensemble du système n’est pas juste, et toute institution qui le perpétue ne peut pas être considérée comme étant ‘juste’, a-t-il dit, ajoutant que la prime FAIRTRADE « n’est pas comparable à la valeur qui est affectée à l’exportateur et la chaîne de magasins de détail. »

 

 

 

Pour Dat Williams au Cameroun, il est essentiel que les agriculteurs soient habilités afin de savoir ce qui se passe, – quels prix s’appliquent, quelles subventions et quels programmes sont disponibles, – pour qu’ils puissent accroître leur pouvoir de négociation.  « Le gouvernement ou les parties prenantes appropriées du secteur de cacao devraient mettre en place des stations de radio locales pour diffuser les informations aux agriculteurs sur les prix du marché, les produits chimiques appropriés à utiliser pendant les saisons agricoles et les intrants nécessaires. »  « Si » dit-il, « ces informations sont diffusées aux agriculteurs dans leurs langues locales, cela aidera à les rendre plus aptes à faire face aux intermédiaires prédateurs. »  Tous les vétérans et les spécialistes de cacao interrogés ont convenu que seulement plus de “pouvoir” pour les agriculteurs eux-mêmes, que ce soit par le biais de revenu ou d’informations, ou de préférence les deux, les aiderait à développer leurs activités et éduquer tous leurs enfants en toute certitude.    

(FIN histoire principale)

====

Encadré 1: Des fèves de cacao au chocolat: Des pays africain en mouvement pour produire le leur

FAIRTRADE vise à créer un lien plus ‘juste’ entre le producteur de cacao et le consommateur de chocolat.  Le lien le plus équitable cependant, serait le lien le plus court : où le cacao peut être transformé en chocolat dans le pays d’origine.  Comme tous les produits fabriqués, le chocolat qui est prêt à manger peut être vendu pour bien plus d’argent qu’une fève de cacao brut.  Dans tous les pays étudiés, les programmes de soutien du gouvernement et des budgets pour les secteurs du cacao comprennent des projets pour les installations de transformation du cacao.

Le Cameroun, par exemple, a établi au cours des dernières années deux sociétés afin de fournir des installations de broyage : SIC Cacao et Chococam.  50 pour cent du capital de SIC Cacao appartient à l’Etat tandis que la plus grand entreprise mondiale de fabrication du chocolat, le conglomérat Barry-Caillebaut, détient l’autre 50 pour cent.  Sic Cacao et Chococam fonctionnent.   Au début de l’année dernière, l’entreprise camerounaise Noha Nyamedjo a annoncé qu’elle allait construire et exploiter une usine de transformation de haute technologie qui transformera environ 5 000 tonnes de fèves de cacao en poudre et liquide de haute qualité.

Des programmes de prêt pour les investissements agricoles n’ont pas encore été développés comme il faut, et certains experts se plaignent que seulement les grands agriculteurs bénéficient des facilités de crédit existantes.   Cependant, si seulement une partie des projets annoncés se concrétisent, des améliorations dans le secteur pourraient être imminentes.  Selon les chiffres officiels, la production augmentera de 14 pour cent à 300 000 tonnes en 2016.  Autrement dit, si des mesures visant à augmenter la production telles que de meilleures techniques de gestion des cultures ainsi que l’augmentation des investissements du secteur privé sont effectivement réalisés. 

Le développement de routes dans le pays annoncé sera d’une importance cruciale. Au cours des 10 prochaines années,  379 million $US seront consacrés à cette amélioration : environ 350 km de routes chaque année.  De nouvelles routes permettront aux agriculteurs de transporter leurs produits de façon plus efficace au marché, réduisant ainsi le risque de perte et assurant qu’une plus grande proportion de leur récolte peut être vendue dans le pays ou à l’étranger. Le niveau de la production de cacao et de la croissance prévue au cours des prochaines années pourrait permettre au Cameroun de dépasser le Nigéria comme le troisième producteur d’Afrique.

En Côte d’Ivoire, après un niveau le plus bas de tous les temps pour les producteurs de cacao sous le gouvernement de Gbagbo, ce qui a conduit à l’élite politique dans la capitale profitant de la quasi-totalité des revenus de cacao, les choses semblent changer. Le gouvernement travaille actuellement avec les grandes sociétés de cacao comme Mars pour augmenter le volume de production des exploitations agricoles et mener des programmes de formation.  Au Ghana, le gouvernement fournit déjà des produits chimiques, des programmes de formation et des outils agricoles aux agriculteurs sur une assez grande échelle.  

Encadré 1a (encadré au sein d’encadré1). Nigéria: “Autrefois je pouvais acheter une bicyclette”

Bien que le gouvernement du Nigéria s’engage à relancer l’industrie du cacao, les agriculteurs de ce pays – un peu comme ailleurs en Afrique de l’Ouest – ne reçoivent pas beaucoup d’encouragement concret.  Edet Akpan Jumbo, 59, à Akwa Ibom, a essayé d’établir une plantation de cacao derrière sa maison il y a dix ans, et a reçu de nouveaux plants hybrides, mais jusqu’à présent il a produit à perte.  « Autrefois je pouvais acheter une bicyclette », dit-il.  « Mais c’est tout. »  Ce sont l’extorsion des agents d’achat  et les prélèvements du gouvernement qui, selon lui, n’existent pas mais qu’il doit payer quand même,  qui sont à blâmer.  (Au Nigéria, les responsables gouvernementaux qui exigent des pots de vin parlent de « prélèvements ». D’où l’utilisation du terme « prélèvements inexistants » dans le langage national).

« Bientôt, de nombreux agriculteurs pourraient se retirer de la culture du cacao et on peut imaginer ce que cela signifie, car de plus en plus de jeunes seraient au chômage », affirme Godwin Ukwu (35), un agent d’achat autorisé et un acteur clé dans la chaîne de valeur de cacao.  Ukwu est propriétaire d’un entrepôt où les fèves de cacao sont stockées pour l’exportation. Il est également secrétaire national de publicité de l’Association de cacao du Nigéria.  Ukwu est d’accord avec le point de vue mondial qu’il s’agit de ‘agrandir ou tomber dans les oubliettes’ pour le producteur de cacao, mais croit que les gouvernements devraient aider l’industrie.  « Le Nigéria a la capacité de devenir le producteur de cacao de premier plan si des encouragements sont accordés aux agriculteurs.  Cela va créer des emplois et contribuer à réduire le niveau de pauvreté élevé dans le  pays.

FAIRTRADE est pour la plupart inconnu au Nigéria.  Selon le président de l’Association nationale de cacao, Sayina Riman, « moins d’un pour cent des producteurs de cacao au Nigéria sont au courant des dispositions de FAIRTRADE. » Les structures nationales du cacao ont mis l’accent pas tant sur un besoin de FAIRTRADE, mais un besoin d’une aide du gouvernement afin d’accéder aux acheteurs internationaux ;  une formation systématique et un programme de remise à neuf afin d’équiper des plantations de cacao pour l’agriculture moderne. « Les cultivateurs on besoin de bons plants de cacao, d’une aide avec leurs plantations et de meilleurs engrais » déclare l’acheteur Gordon Ukwu. Et cela va sans dire, la pratique d’imposer les « prélèvements inexistants » devrait être abolie.

====

Encadré 2 Mengballa

Pour augmenter leurs revenus provenant des plantations de cacao, les agriculteurs dans les régions du sud et du centre du Cameroun utilisent le jus pressé de cacao frais pour préparer un gin local populairement nommé « mengballa ». Un sac de 65 kg de fèves de cacao fraîches peut produire environ cinq litres de jus qui, lorsque brassé localement, peut produire environ un litre et demi de gin mengballa qui peut rapporter l’équivalent d’environ 4 $US. Selon les habitants, le buveur de mengballa peut être reconnu facilement car la langue, les lèvres et les dents sont tachées en noir par la liqueur noire. En raison de l’absence de normalisation, de règlementation sanitaire et de différentes façons de brassage visant à atteindre le pourcentage d’alcool le plus élevé, le visiteur inexpérimenté est conseillé de ne pas l’essayer.  Pour ces raisons il est actuellement impropre à l’exportation.

====

Encadré 3: Est-ce qu’il s’agit du travail des enfants ou du travail familial ?

FAIRTRADE met en application beaucoup de normes et critères pour les agriculteurs qui souhaitent vendre aux gros acheteurs par le biais du réseau FAIRTRADE.  Un agriculteur doit exploiter de manière respectueuse de l’environnement, utiliser certains produits chimiques et méthodes, et n’est pas autorisé à utiliser le travail des enfants, le travail saisonnier, ou le travail à des salaires inférieurs au salaire minimum.  Ce qui apparaît agréable, jusqu’à ce que l’on se rende compte que cela exclut pour la plupart tout agriculteur ouest-africain qui dépend des matériaux bon marché et de l’aide de sa famille élargie.

Au Cameroun, au Ghana et en Côte d’Ivoire, tous les agriculteurs  interrogés souhaitent que leurs enfants aillent à l’école, mais ont ajouté que, pour payer les frais scolaires, ils ne pouvaient pas se passer de l’aide des enfants le week-end et en période de récolte. Au Cameroun, les 30 plantations visitées par l’équipe d’investigation dans les régions du Sud-ouest, du Sud et du Centre, étaient détenues par des familles. Les enfants de ces familles travaillaient après l’école et le week-end, ce qui contribue à la survie de la famille.  Dan Williams, propriétaire de plantation a expliqué: « Quand il est temps de casser les cabosses de cacao, je rassemble mes enfants et les enfants de la famille pour les emmener à la plantation pour aider.  Cela est considéré comme faisant partie des tâches ménagères pour aider les parents.  Je ne le considère pas comme la maltraitance des enfants parce que nous gagnons de l’argent pour payer leurs frais scolaires.

Tous les agriculteurs interviewés souhaitaient que leurs enfants fréquentent l’école. Les seuls obstacles mentionnés, par ordre d’importance, étaient de ne pas gagner assez d’argent pour payer les frais scolaires, et l’absence d’une école à proximité. Beaucoup d’agriculteurs ont mentionné que l’interdiction du travail des enfants risquait de réduire les revenus des familles et par conséquent les chances des enfants d’aller à l’école.

Le chef Chief Bisong Etahoben a dit au sujet de l’équipe d’investigation au Cameroun « C’était une expérience passionnante quand nous, les enfants, étions emmenés dans les plantations pour casser les cabosses de cacao.  Nous sucions les fèves et buvions le jus. Il nous a paru partie de devenir un membre responsable de la famille.  Aujourd’hui mon petit frère qui travaille sur nos plantions de cacao utilise toujours ses neuf enfants pour l’aider. Nous sommes tous allés à l’école ainsi que mes neveux et mes nièces. »

Au Ghana, la scolarisation a été identifiée comme l’une des plus grandes nécessités de la coopérative Kuapa Kokoo et à travers la Côte d’Ivoire, les panneaux publicitaires en bordure des routes dans les principales villes affichent des publicités contre le travail des enfants. Les grandes entreprises dans le secteur du cacao se sont jointes à une campagne gouvernementale pour aider à l’éradiquer; le géant Mars a convenu d’allouer 2,7 million $US pour aborder les efforts contre le  travail des enfants, dont la scolarité est un élément important.

====

Notes:

(1): Le principe Arizona provient de l’initiative prise par l’association des journalistes Investigative Reporters and Editors (IRE) aux EtatsUnis, en 1976, quand le journaliste Don Bolles a été assassiné lors d’une enquête sur des activités criminelles en Arizona (US). IRE a demandé à ses membres de venir en Arizona pour travailler sur la même histoire que Bolles et de la publier partout dans le pays.  En conséquence, 38 journalistes de 28 entreprises de presse sont descendus sur Arizona pour enquêter sur les mêmes réseaux de criminalité et de corruption que Don Bolles : en d’autres termes, continuer son travail.  En conséquence, l’impact de l’histoire de Don Bolles a multiplié par 100.

(2) FAIRTRADE n’est pas le seul label de certification ayant des coopératives partenaires dans cette région. Il y a aussi des coopératives qui travaillent avec des labels qui se concentrent sur l’agriculture durable, comme UTZ et Rainforest Alliance. Ceux-ci ont été également étudiés par Kouassi. 

 (3) Des sources dans l’industrie de certification en Côte d’Ivoire (noms connus de l’équipe et du rédacteur) ont déclaré que le travail des enfants a lieu toujours même dans les plantations certifiées et que la ‘surveillance montre des lacunes’: une chose pour laquelle certains agriculteurs qui luttent afin de survivre sont reconnaissants.

(4)Le prix minimum est basé sur une estimation du ‘coût de production’ par FAIRTRADE lui-même. Le porte-parole de Max Havelaar, a lors d’un entretien, affirmé que le minimum est au moins aussi basé sur le prix que FAIRTRADE considère acceptable pour le consommateur dans le magasin.

(5) Au cours des dix dernières années, deux journalistes étrangers, Jean Hélène et Guy Andre Kieffer, ont disparu et ont probablement été assassinés au cours de leurs enquêtes sur la «mafia de cacao » en Côte d’Ivoire. Beaucoup de journalistes locaux ont fui le pays ou abandonné les enquêtes en raison des menaces persistantes.   Voir aussi http://fairwhistleblower.ca/content/cocoa-plays-key-role-ivory-coast-stalemate.

(6) Rapport: THE INTERNATIONAL FAIRTRADE MOVEMENT AND PROSPECTS FOR CAMEROONIAN PRODUCER ORGANISATIONS, Dr Michael Njume Ebong, International Development Consultant,  Project Professionnalisation Agricole et Renforcement Institutionnel (PARI ), AFD/Minader (French agriculture ministry), 2010

*Lorsqu’un nom est indiqué par un astérisque, ce nom a été changé à la demande de la personne interviewée.

L’arnaque du chocolat de FairTrade

* De Selay Kouassi (Côte d’Ivoire), Chief Bisong Etahoben (Cameroun), Benjamin Tetteh (Ghana), Aniefiok Udonquak (Nigéria), Bjinse Dankert et Janneke Donkerlo (Pays-Bas), Charles Rukuni (chef d’équipe), Evelyn Groenink (rédacteur)

Dans un projet transnational de six mois mené par le Forum des journalistes d’investigation africains (FAIR), des journalistes venant de Côte d’Ivoire, du Ghana, du Cameroun, du Nigéria et des Pays-Bas ont étudié les prétendus avantages reçus par les producteurs de cacao en Afrique de l’Ouest par l’intermédiaire de la marque FAIRTRADE. 

 

Leurs conclusions sont choquantes: Même si le consommateur de chocolat en Occident paie une importante majoration pour le chocolat ‘honnête’,  ces avantages représentent peu ou pas d’amélioration dans la vie des cultivateurs de cacao.  Dans certains cas, en raison de la domination croissante des coopératives de FAIRTRADE, des agriculteurs étaient dans une situation pire qu’avant.   Le dossier complet est intitulé ‘L’arnaque du chocolat de FAIRTRADE’, et a été partiellement financé par le  Programme for African Investigative Reporters (PAIR).  L’histoire, dont certaines parties ont été déjà publiées en néerlandais, a fait grand bruit aux Pays-Bas.

 

——-

Les images des cultivateurs de cacao heureux en Afrique sur le chocolat de ‘FAIRTRADE’ acheté par les consommateurs en Occident sont destinées à faire croire au consommateur que les larges sourires sont le résultat du commerce équitable réel : un soutien et un meilleur revenu.  Mais cette impression est fausse.

L’exploitation dans l’industrie du cacao en Afrique de l’Ouest continue, mais avec un nouveau venu nouvel acteur sur la  scène: FAIRTRADE lui-même, qui bénéficie de la majoration supplémentaire payée par des consommateurs.   L’étiquette de FAIRTRADE (délivrée par la société-sœur de certification de FAIRTRADE, Flo-Cert), saluée il y a vingt ans comme une institution innovatrice qui permettrait d’améliorer les conditions de vie des agriculteurs dans l’industrie du cacao en Afrique de l’Ouest, n’a pas été à la hauteur de ses promesses.  Des agriculteurs qui vendent à travers le circuit de FAIRTRADE:

·         Ne reçoivent pas plus de revenus pour leurs récoltes que les agriculteurs « ordinaires » ;

·         Ne sont pas tenus au courant des prix du marché mondial du cacao par les coopératives de FAIRTRADE qui sont censées les rendre autonomes ;

·         Reçoivent peu ou pas de bénéfices des primes versées aux coopératives de FAIRTRADE des fonds supplémentaires de FAIRTRADE payés par les consommateurs ;

·         N’ont pas été souvent informés comment, ou même que, FAIRTRADE est censé leur être utile ;

·         Sont parfois évincés de l’agriculture dans les zones où les coopératives de FAIRTRADE sont devenues dominantes.

 

En outre, en Côte d’Ivoire, des individus dans la fameuse ‘mafia du cacao’  sont devenus des chevilles ouvrières en tant que partenaires dans les coopératives de FAIRTRADE.  Au Ghana, où FAIRTRADE a établi des liens étroits avec le Conseil de cacao (COCOBOD), des experts agricoles se plaignent que le modèle FAIRTRADE perpétue le système de commerce traditionnel ‘inéquitable’ selon lequel l’agriculteur demeure au bas de l’échelle.

De manière plus poignante, les statistiques de FAIRTRADE montrent que la partie qui gagne le plus d’argent grâce au cacao du commerce équitable est FAIRTRADE lui-même. Le titulaire de la marque FAIRTRADE aux Pays-Bas, la Fondation Max Havelaar, gagne 6 cents US de chaque barre de chocolat FAIRTRADE de 2,50 $ US.  Par contre, le “supplément” FAIRTRADE versé aux coopératives ouest-africaines à partir de la même barre de chocolat ne s’élève qu’à 2,5 cents US (voir le graphique 1).   C’est ce qui ressort également des rapports annuels de Max Havelaar.  Un exemple: l’organisme certificateur FAIRTRADE a gagné 416 618 Euro (environ 520 000 $US) à partir des redevances (qui leur sont versées par les entreprises de chocolat pour le droit d’utilisation du logo FAIRTRADE) en 2009, tandis que moins de la moitié de ce montant (175 000 Euro ou 218 750 $US) a été versée aux coopératives de producteurs de cacao FAIRTRADE pendant cette année-là.

 

Ce sont les résultats d’une enquête transnationale de six mois menée par des journalistes du Forum des journalistes d’investigation africains (www.fairreporters.net) en Côte d’Ivoire, au Cameroun, au Ghana et au Nigéria avec des collègues aux Pays-Bas et soutenus par le Programme for African Investigative Reporting (PAIR).

Cette enquête journalistique complète sur les promesses et les pratiques de FAIRTRADE porte sur toute la région productrice de cacao en Afrique de l’Ouest.  Elle a été entreprise après la première enquête menée par Selay Kouassi, membre de l’équipe en Côte d’Ivoire, sur FAIRTRADE et d’autres activités de certification générales dans le secteur du cacao en Côte d’Ivoire. Après la première publication sur ce sujet, Kouassi a reçu un certain nombre d’appels téléphoniques menaçants et a dû se cacher.  Plusieurs de ses sources étaient également menacées. 

Les menaces étaient la raison pour laquelle FAIR s’est lancé dans une enquête à l’échelle régionale sur le même sujet, en conformité avec le ‘principe Arizona’ (1) selon lequel une enquête doit être étendue et approfondie dès qu’un/e journaliste qui a initialement étudié l’histoire se rend compte qu’il/elle est menacé(e).  Le message Arizona est: On peut faire taire un journaliste, mais on ne peut pas tuer une histoire.  Cette enquête sur les promesses et les pratiques de FAIRTRADE est donc un projet Arizona. (Pour une référence sur l’origine du nom ‘projet Arizona’, cliquez ici : http://legacy.ire.org/history/arizonaproject.html.)

Il est, cependant, important de souligner qu’il n’est pas clairement établi de laquelle des coopératives  dans le secteur lucratif du cacao en Côte d’Ivoire que proviennent les menaces dont  Kouassi et ses sources ont fait l’objet (2).   Cette enquête se concentre exclusivement sur le label FAIRTRADE car c’est le  seul qui promet un meilleur revenu pour le cultivateur de cacao.  C’était cette promesse qui a été mise à l’épreuve et qui s’est avérée être, pour la plupart, fausse.  C’était également l’argument principal dans l’ouvrage antérieur de Kouassi.

Pour l’enquête, l’équipe a :

1.       Visité des dizaines de plantations de cacao et des coopératives, et a interviewé plus de 70 cultivateurs de cacao en Côte d’Ivoire, au Ghana, au Cameroun et au Nigéria (associés ou non associés à FAIRTRADE)

2.       Interviewé des représentants, et a examiné des documents avec soin, des coopératives de FAIRTRADE  en Côte d’Ivoire, au Ghana et au Cameroun.

3.       Accédé aux statistiques et aux documents gouvernementaux en Côte d’Ivoire, au Ghana, au Cameroun et au Nigéria

4.       Interviewé des représentants de syndicats agricoles au Nigéria, en Côte d’Ivoire et au Ghana (il n’y a pas de syndicats agricoles au Cameroun)

5.       Interviewé des représentants de FAIRTRADE aux Pays-Bas.

6.       Etudié des rapports annuels de FAIRTRADE

7.       Etabli un prix par barre de chocolat du consommateur à l’agriculteur

8.       Mis à profit des recherches et des publications antérieures sur le sujet.

 

Piégé dans un labyrinthe FAIRTRADE

Frédéric Doua (39), propriétaire d’une plantation de cacao de 4 hectares à Assoumoukro dans le nord du premier producteur mondial de cacao, la Côte d’Ivoire, regrette d’avoir rejoint la coopérative locale de FAIRTRADE, UIREVI, il y a quatre ans.  Depuis, sa récolte reste souvent dans des entrepôts en attendant que l’acheteur occasionnel de FAIRTRADE se présente.  « Ce n’est pas ce qu’on m’a promis » dit-il.  « On m’a dit que si je me concentrais sur le cacao, exclusivement, en produisais beaucoup, j’obtiendrais des prix plus élevés et des primes.  Mais ce qui s’est passé, c’est que je dépendais trop des prix du cacao et des acheteurs de FAIRTRADE.  Autrefois je cultivais des cultures vivrières pour la consommation de ma famille ainsi que le cacao, maintenant je dois utiliser le revenu de ma récolte pour acheter de la nourriture.  Payer les frais scolaires de mes enfants devient de plus en plus difficile. »

Le voisin de Doua à Amoussoukro, Arnaud Kassi, explique que, en tant que membre d’une coopérative certifiée de FAIRTRADE, on ‘ne peut pas vendre des fèves en dehors du circuit de FAIRTRADE’.  Maintenant sa récolte doit attendre souvent dans les entrepôts.   Kassi, propriétaire d’une plantation de cacao de 3,5 hectares estime qu’il a été « piégé » dans ce qu’il décrit comme un « labyrinthe FAIRTRADE », ajoutant qu’il se fâche quand il doit attendre des mois avant de pouvoir récupérer son argent pour la récolte au siège de la coopérative qui est le partenaire officiel de FAIRTRADE.

Bien que Kassi estime qu’il bénéficie de temps en temps d’une « prime FAIRTRADE », il dit que le montant est si petit et il met si longtemps pour être payé, que cet avantage devient négligeable. « La prime nous est versée d’un seul coup, lors d’une cérémonie de fin d’année organisée par la coopérative », dit Kassi. « Mais il faut attendre longtemps avant qu’elle nous parvienne.  Il faut s’occuper de la famille etde la scolarité des enfants.  Nous empruntons du liquide aux personnes que nous connaissons, mais il faut payer les intérêts.  Au moment où la prime nous tombe entre les mains, nos dettes personnelles ont tellement augmenté que le paiement final n’attenue guère la douleur ».  Doua ajoute : « Les deux tiers de la prime va à la direction de la coopérative de toute façon. 

 Kwesi Agyei, un cultivateur de cacaoà Atwima Mponua dans la région Ashanti au Ghana, est membre de la coopérative locale de FAIRTRADE, Kuapa Kokoo, mais il dit qu’il n’a jamais entendu parler d’un phénomène « FAIRTRADE ».  Il croit que le supplément d’un dollar (1,00 $ US) qu’il reçoit de temps en temps de Kuapa Kokoo est un cadeau de la direction de Luapa Kokoo.    Il n’est pas conscient du fait que FAIRTRADE fait de la publicité dans le monde entier pour des avantages impressionnants tels que des prix minimum, des primes et des projets communautaires.  Onze autres cultivateurs, choisis au hasard parmi les vendeurs de la région Ashanti au réseau FAIRTRADE de la coopérative Kuapa Kokoo, ont déclaré, lors d’une interview, qu’ils étaient également dans le noir, bien qu’ils aient payé un dollar pour les frais d’adhésion « FAIRTRADE » à la coopérative

Bien qu’un cultivateur puisse vendre du cacao “ordinaire” et non-identifié à une coopérative sans en être membre, des coopératives de FAIRTRADE encouragent les petits agriculteurs à devenir membres, de sorte que leur cacao peut faire partie de la chaîne du cacao étiqueté de FAIRTRADE.  Les coopératives qui se sont associées à FAIRTRADE promettent aux cultivateurs la prime tant vantée de FAIRTRADE en récompense de leur adhésion.   Mais, au Ghana aussi, les avantages de cette prime sont contestés. Dans un documentaire réalisé par l’importateur de chocolat et journaliste hollandais Teun van der Keuken en 2007 2004, un administrateur de coopérative Kuapa Kokoo avoue franchement que de nombreux agriculteurs refusent d’être membres de Kuapa Kokoo parce que « les frais d’adhésion sont plus élevés que la primes qu’ils reçoivent », (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z202CnEvaA8).

D’un autre côté, il devient de plus en plus difficile pour les petits agriculteurs de rester indépendants.  Kuapa Kokoo et les autres coopératives deviennent de plus en plus puissantes ;  la demande de cacao certifié des coopératives augmente chaque jour.  Les 12 agriculteurs de Kuapa Kokoo, interviewés pour la présente enquête avaient tous payé les frais d’adhésion (de 1,00 $ US) parce qu’il paraissait logique de combiner leurs ressources comme une coopérative, même si cela impliquait qu’ils devaient se conformer aux règles de FAIRTRADE.  (Une fois que vous êtes producteur de FAIRTRADE, votre production doit se conformer aux normes de FAIRTRADE: les enfants de votre famille ne sont pas autorisés à aider dans les champs même si cela réduit la récolte et le revenue de la famille; si vous embauchez une aide extérieure il faut payer un salaire minimum ; il y a aussi des règles concernant l’utilisation des pesticides, des engrais et des méthodes agricoles. (3) Voir aussi: “Est-ce qu’il s’agit du travail des enfants ou du travail familial?” dans le présent rapport.)

La même domination des coopératives commence à se manifester en Côte d’Ivoire où les entreprises familiales basées dans les villages n’ont pas d’autre choix à part rejoindre les coopératives, leur vendre, ou se tourner vers les colporteurs louches afin de vendre leur récolte à des prix encore plus bas. « Je voudrais vendre à de gros acheteurs de la même façon que les coopératives » déclare Albert Yao, qui est propriétaire d’une plantation de cacao de deux hectares à Daloa, près de la coopérative KAVOKIVA en Côte d’Ivoire. « Mais ils achètent seulement des produits provenant de plantations de cacao certifiées.  Je ne suis pas certifié.  Où est-ce que je vais trouver de l’argent pour survivre et m’occuper de ma famille si je ne vends pas ma récolte ? »  Plutôt que devenir sujet des coopératives, Yao voudrait garder son indépendance et devenir producteur certifié à part entière.  Mais ce n’est pas possible, car FAIRTRADE ne certifie pas de producteurs individuels, seulement des coopératives.  D’après Yao: « Le système FAIRTRADE renforce le pouvoir des coopératives au détriment des petits producteurs de cacao.

Le président ne voyage pas pour le plaisir

Le prix de vente du cacao dans la région diffère mais cela dépend principalement des intermédiaires et des infrastructures.  Au moment de la publication de ce dossier, le prix du marché mondial du cacao a varié autour de 2,40 $US par kilogramme.  Des frais locaux tels que les transports et les intermédiaires représentent environ 1 $US par kilogramme, parfois plus: Cela dépend de combien de temps il faut pour transporter les fèves au port ou à l’usine de transformation.  Si votre plantation se trouve au bout d’une route en mauvais état au Cameroun ou en Côte d’Ivoire, il se peut que vous receviez aussi peu que 1 $ US par kilogramme; si vous aviez la chance de vivre près du port avec un bon système de transport à portée de main, vous pourriez gagner 1,60 $US par kilogramme ou même un peu plus. Il n’y a pas de différence entre des acheteurs de cacao FAIRTRADE et des acheteurs de cacao ‘ordinaires’ à cet égard.  FAIRTRADE garantit un ‘prix minimum’ de 2 $US par kilogramme, mais ce prix est inférieur au prix du marché mondial depuis des années (4).

Par conséquent, le seul avantage de la vente à FAIRTRADE est la soi-disant prime qui est de 200 $US par tonne, ou 20 cents US par kilogramme.  Cet argent est payé par les entreprises qui achètent du cacao certifié FAIRTRADE, et ne va pas à des producteurs individuels mais à la coopérative FAIRTRADE.  FAIRTRADE stipule que les membres de la coopérative doivent décider démocratiquement de la façon dont la prime est dépensée, mais dans la pratique, nos entretiens avec les agriculteurs montrent que, de temps en temps,  les leaders déboursent un montant insignifiant aux agriculteurs individuels qui pensent que les petits dons sont des cadeaux.  Dans le cas de Kuapa Kokoo, entre 75 et 100 pour cent de la prime qu’un agriculteur gagne sur sa récolte revient à la coopérative. 

La direction de la coopérative paie pour la certification initiale et la vérification annuelle: ces fonds affluent immédiatement vers FAIRTRADE. (Le coût de la certification peut varier de 1 000 $US jusqu’à plusieurs fois ce montant;  la vérification annuelle de FAIRTRADE peut s’élever à 8 000 $US).  La coopérative paie alors ses frais de déplacement, des réunions et d’autres frais de gestion. C’est seulement après cela que la coopérative offre quelques ‘projets sociaux’ à la communauté.

Christiana Ohene-Agyare, président de Kuapa Kokoo au Ghana, estime que la coopérative est fière des « nombreux avantages pour nos communautés agricoles » qui ont été fournis.   Elle fait mention d’une structure pour un bâtiment scolaire – qui n’est pas réellement une école car il n’y a pas d’enseignants ou de matériel pédagogique -, plusieurs forages et des entrepôts pour le stockage des fèves de cacao de la coopérative.  La plupart de l’argent a cependant été investi dans un bâtiment multi-complexe à Kumasi, la deuxième plus grande ville du Ghana. « Nous allons le louer pour apporter plus de revenus à l’organisation » déclare  Ohene-Agyare. Elle se réfère également aux programmes d’apprentissage et à un système de microcrédit.

Des agriculteurs membres de Kuapa Kokoo comme Kwesi Agyei, cependant, n’ont pas connaissance d’un projet d’école, de possibilités de formation ou de facilités de crédit. « J’aimerais un accès aux petits prêts » déclare Kwesi Agyei.  « Mais une telle possibilité n’existe pas à Kuapa Kokoo.  Au contraire, parfois ils ne me paient pas à temps.  Alors je m’endette ». Les retards de paiement l’inquiètent et les autres agriculteurs également, car ils n’ont pas de liquidité pour permettre les dettes, et encore moins pour payer les intérêts.

A la coopérative KAVOKIVA, à 250 km environ de Yakassé Attobrou, à Gonaté,  en Côte d’Ivoire, la situation est similaire.  La Coopérative Agricole KAVOKIVA de Daloa réunit plus de 5 000 producteurs de cacao, est en tête du secteur du cacao dans la région et est certifiée FAIRTRADE depuis 2004, avec une capacité de production d’environ 17 000 tonnes de fèves de cacao.    

Ici, pas un seul agriculteur ne conteste ouvertement les affirmations du président Fulgence N’Guessans. Selon lui,  par le biais de FAIRTRADE, sa direction de la coopérative a apporté beaucoup d’avantages.  N’Guessan, orateur lors des conférences de FAIRTRADE à travers le monde, aime beaucoup les citer: une école primaire, une clinique, des pompes à main pour l’eau, un programme d’alphabétisme pour les femmes.  Toutefois, en privé et de façon anonyme, les agriculteurs contestent ce qu’il dit.  Les pompes sont cassées, disent-ils, et personne ne vient les réparer, juste comme personne n’est venu les entretenir quand elles étaient neuves.    Il en va de même pour deux des trois puits. L’ambulance achetée avec l’argent de FAIRTRADE a été retirée du service presque dès le début, ajoutent-ils. Pourtant, avec une capacité de production de 17 000 tonnes, KAVOKIVA doit avoir vendu environ 8 000 tonnes de cacao de FAIRTRADE en 2010, rapportant 1,6 million $US en primes.

Les agriculteurs disent en privé qu’ils préféreraient que les coopératives utilisent l’argent pour l’ amélioration des infrastructures, comme les routes, afin d’atteindre plus d’acheteurs.  Ils ont également des idées sur l’irrigation.  « Des pompes à main n’aident pas.  Nous avons besoin d’un château d’eau.  Le président devrait plutôt investir notre argent dans un tel projet » a déclaré Kouassi Soro* (28). Mais Soro et les autres n’ont presque jamais l’occasion de parler à Fulgence N’Guessan. Un autre agriculteur Issa Kalou(36)*: « Le président N’Guessan voyage pour assister à des conférences internationales sur l’agriculture et l’économie.  Mais nous ne voyons pas de résultats de ces conférences.  Pour autant que nous sachions, il pourrait faire du shopping ».  Et un collègue ajoute: « Depuis que la coopérative a un bureau à Abidjan, il y habite. »

Quand on lui a demandé des commentaires, N’Guessan a rétorqué qu’il « ne voyageait pas pour le plaisir » et a affirmé que, dans la région beaucoup plus d’enfants allaient à l’école que « dans le passé ». Il a ajouté  que « les gens qui me critiquent ne devraient pas oublier cela ». Il ne pouvait cependant pasdire comment l’accès à l’éducation s’était amélioré dans la région, ou si une telle amélioration, s’il y en a, avait eu lieu grâce à KAVOKIVA.

La même image de « avantages communautaires » douteux se dessine à la coopérative UIREVI en Côte d’Ivoire.  La prime FAIRTRADE d’UIREVI pour 2010 s’est élevée à 108 539 $ US. D’après le livre de comptabilité d’UIREVI 60 pour cent de cette somme a été allouée à la « consolidation économique », des conférences et des réunions de la direction (voir le graphique 2).  17 pour cent des revenus de prime ont été consacrés aux ‘services de santé’ et ‘kits scolaires’ pour les enfants des agriculteurs.  Mais lors des entretiens il a été révélé que les ‘kits scolaires’ ne comprenaient que quelques feuilles de papier et un crayon.  En ce qui concerne le poste budgétaire des services de santé, les agriculteurs ont dit qu’ils ne savaient pas à quoi cela se référait.

Le Conseil UIREVI a refusé de commenter l’utilisation de la prime FAIRTRADE et a déclaré que «les réunions ainsi que les autres projets ont été approuvés par  tous les agriculteurs lors de l’assemblée générale annuelle », et que « tout a été fait de façon démocratique ».

C’est aussi la réponse toute faite de FAIRTRADE lorsque l’on l’interroge sur l’utilisation des fonds de prime dans les coopératives. « La coopérative tient une assemblée générale annuelle de tous les agriculteurs membres et l’utilisation des fonds de prime est décidée de façon démocratique par eux » déclare Jochum Veerman de la Fondation Max Havelaar, l’institutionbasée aux Bays-Bas, qui attribue le label FAIRTRADE aux entreprises, reprenant la réponse que le cinéaste néerlandais Teun van der Keuken a reçu en  2007 2004.

La conclusion tirée de la réponse de FAIRTRADE est que si « les gens eux-mêmes » dans ces régions lointaines ne savent pas gérer leur prise de décision démocratique, c’est leur problème et pas celui de FAIRTRADE.  Cependant, en insistant pour que les petits agriculteurs rejoignent des coopératives,  FAIRTRADE aggrave des problèmes d’exploitation et d’abus de grands patrons traditionnels du cacao, en particulier en Côte d’Ivoire, où ils sont la cheville ouvrière dans un réseau connu sous le nom de ‘mafia de cacao’.(5)    Les agriculteurs interrogés en Côte d’Ivoire ont confirmé, sans exception, que les ‘grands agriculteurs les plus puissants’ dans une région, d’une manière ou d’une autre, finissent souvent par être  ‘démocratiquement élus’ à la tête de la direction.  Après tout, ce sont eux qui produisent le plus de cacao, sont en tête des réseaux, ont les meilleures connexions de téléphone mobile, les bureaux bien équipés, parlent les langues occidentales nécessaires, et – très important pour les vérifications annuelles -, embauchent les aides comptables et les comptables.

Le petit agriculteur peut officiellement avoir le droit démocratique d’interroger le président de la coopérative lors de l’assemblée générale annuelle, mais si vous ne voulez pas vous attirer des ennuis  en Côte d’Ivoire, vous ne mettrez pas le président de la coopérative en colère.   Ousmane Attai, spécialiste des marchandises et expert dans le secteur du cacao basé à Abidjan, explique que beaucoup d’agriculteurs en Côte d’Ivoire sont analphabètes et habitués à l’exploitation. « Ils ne comprennent pas les accords de FAIRTRADE.  Ils sont habitués à une situation où les fonctionnaires sont riches, et que ceux-ci peuvent choisir avec qui ils souhaitent partager leur richesse.  Ils sont reconnaissants des miettes qu’ils reçoivent car ils ne connaissent pas le concept des primes, et encore moins qu’ils ont droit à celles-ci ».  Pour citer un autre expert, le sociologue ivoirien Oumar Silue: « Comment voulez-vous que les gens se disputent avec un représentant qui est en même temps une autorité traditionnelle et un ancien dans leur contexte, » surtout si cette autorité et cet ancien est aussi le visage phare du réseau croissant et de plus en plus important de FAIRTRADE, le partenaire de tous les grands acheteurs ?

« Nous recevons tous un pourcentage, mais nous ne savons pas de quoi »

En théorie, le cas de FAIRTRADE et un partenariat entre FAIRTRADE et des coopératives fondées sur les affiliations, semble être une bonne idée. Après tout, les pays ouest-africains où la ressource de cacao brut est cultivée, souffrent tous d’une mauvaise gestion de l’Etat et de la corruption et l’exploitation des agriculteurs par les acheteurs multinationaux ainsi que les intermédiaires locaux.  FAIRTRADE a été conçu au départ comme une réponse à ces problèmes.  Mais, comme on le voit ci-dessus, une coopérative partenaire n’est pas une institution juste, transparente, démocratique tout simplement parce qu’un partenaire externe veut qu’elle le soit.  Des relations de pouvoir, des hiérarchies et des structures de gestion (fonctionnelles ou défectueuses) sont des caractéristiques de l’ensemble du pays.  Penser qu’on peut, de l’extérieur, encourager des ‘îlots’ à fonctionner différemment  au sein d’une société ne semble guère réaliste.

Il y a deux ans à Konye, au sud-ouest du Cameroun, 305 petits agriculteurs qui en avaient marre de l’exploitation par des fonctionnaires et des intermédiaires corrompus se sont endettés conjointement à hauteur de 6 000 $ US, – afin de payer le certificat de FAIRTRADE et ont établi la coopérative KONAFCOOP. Dès lors, selon le responsable de KONAFCOOP, Asek Zachee, la coopérative a reçu 12 000 $US sous forme de primes.  Mais Zachee se tait quand on lui demande combien d’argent a été versé aux agriculteurs individuels.  « Ils reçoivent 25% », dit-il, mais n’explique pas comment le pourcentage est calculé : sur quel montant, quelle période, et est-ce que c’est par agriculteur individuel ou la coopérative ? « Je vais le vérifier dans les documents et revenir vers vous » dit-il.

Le révérend Okie Ewang Joseph, un ancien de la communauté, un ami de Zachee et membre de  KONAFCOOP, se dit satisfait de la formation que des anciens du village ont reçu de  la coopérative.  Se tenant ensemble, les deux hommes expliquent que la formation était utile.  « Connaître les techniques d’entretien et de construction de votre exploitation agricole vous permet de dépenser moins d’argent sur les intrants et de générer davantage.  Nous avons commencé à voir également d’autres avantages grâce à une gestion intégrée des coopératives. » Mais Zachee ajoute que l’argent en général est encore très lent: « Nous avons vendu seulement 100 tonnes de nos fèves à l’étranger depuis que nous sommes affiliés à FAIRTRADE il y a deux ans. »

 La quantité vendue par KONAFCOOP ne semble pas correspondre à la prime totale reçue de 12 000 $US, selon Zachee. Une vente de 100 tonnes, à une prime (sur paiement de récolte normale) de 200 $US, s’élèverait à 20 000 $US.  Interrogé sur le revenu exact de la prime, la partie de la prime qui revient aux agriculteurs individuels, la partie qui a été utilisée afin de rembourser la dette à FAIRTRADE pour la vérification initiale et la certification et la partie qui a été investie dans le projet de formation, Zachee répète : « Je vais le vérifier dans mes documents et revenir vers vous ». Mais au cours des prochains jours, des semaines et des mois le responsable de KONAFCOOP ne répond pas à son téléphone.

Pour survivre, KONAFCOOP doit produire plus et trouver plus d’acheteurs, et ce n’est pas facile. FAIRTRADE décline toute responsabilité quant à trouver des acheteurs pour ceux qui se joignent à leurs coopératives, même s’ils paient les frais de certification considérables(4). 

                                                                               

« Les coopératives deviennent des intermédiaires, juste comme les fonctionnaires et les agents d’achat »

Comme expliqué précédemment, FAIRTRADE n’est pas sorti de nulle part.  Il s’agissait d’une intervention,  inventée il y a 20 ans par le commerce international et des structures politiques, comme une solution (partielle) à un problème bien réel : des prix bas pour des ressources naturelles,  la pauvreté dans les pays qui cultivent la plupart de ces ressources, l’exploitation et la corruption dans ces pays (pour la plupart en voie de développement). Dire que FAIRTRADE n’a pas beaucoup aidé ne signifie pas que le problème a disparu.  Il existe toujours. 

Prenons l’exemple du Cameroun.  Au lieu de recevoir l’aide gouvernementale, le cultivateur de cacao est confronté  à l’extorsion des fonctionnaires et des intermédiaires.  Tout d’abord, les responsables gouvernementaux chargés de mener des programmes agricoles, qui comprennent la distribution gratuite de plants, d’outils et de tracteurs, ne les offrent pas gratuitement, mais exigent un paiement.   Ayuk Orock, un jeune diplômé basé à Barombi, qui a été plus ou moins forcé d’entrer dans la culture du cacao en raison du manque d’emploi même pour les diplômés au Cameroun, a payé 50 cents US  chacun pour des plants « gratuits ».  « Parfois, même après avoir payé, vous ne les recevez pas.  Les fonctionnaires ne donnent pas de reçus, donc vous n’avez pas de preuve du paiement » dit-il.

Des outils agricoles ‘gratuits’, quand ils sont distribués, peuvent disparaître dès qu’ils se matérialisent. « Il n’est pas rare ici de voir un gros camion qui apporte des machettes, des pelles, des outils de creusage, des brouettes et des produits chimiques de Yaounde un jour, et de voir le même camion les transportant vers l’autre côté du Mungo (le Cameroun francophone) le jour suivant, où ils disparaissent dans des exploitations agricoles individuelles » déclare Nnoko Clement, un agriculteur de Kwa-Kwa.

Au moment des récoltes, les sacs de fèves de cacao des agriculteurs sont achetés, souvent pour une bagatelle, par des ‘agents d’achat autorisés’ avec des balances défectueuses et des propositions qui sont à prendre ou à laisser.  Les agents d’achat autorisés, ou LBA’s en abrégé, se déplacent et  achètent du cacao directement dans l’exploitation agricole pour le vendre aux usines de transformation – ou directement en Europe – à un prix majoré. Agriculteur expérimenté, Dat Williams, propriétaire de grandes plantations de cacao familiales à Meme, le ‘centre du cacao’ au Cameroun déclare : « Ils finissent par endetter l’agriculteur.  Ils paient parfois à l’avance pour les cultures à être récoltées, et non pas en argent, mais par  le biais de produits chimiques et d’autres intrants agricoles. Ces articles sont, cependant, vendus à des prix élevés, parfois plus de trois à cinq fois l’équivalent du prix du marché local ».  Williams estime que « maintenant il n’y a pratiquement aucun agriculteur qui n’est endetté envers les LBA. »

« Quand vous n’avez nulle part où aller pour obtenir de l’argent afin de payer l’éducation de vos enfants, vous n’avez pas d’autre choix que d’accepter les conditions  « Shylock » des LBA » confirme Essambe Joseph, un agriculteur dans le village de Kumba. « La saison des récoltes commence en octobre mais les écoles rouvrent en septembre alors quand l’école rouvre et vous n’avez pas d’argent pour envoyer vos enfants à l’école, les LBA sont utiles et proposent des crédits de caisse, dont le remboursement est finalement en nature avec des fèves de cacao, dont la valeur peut être plusieurs fois supérieure au montant que vous avez reçu du LBA ».“

Beaucoup de LBA sont des entreprises dirigées par des individus qui se sont retrouvés dans ces positions du jour au lendemain sans revenu visible ou garantie, mais qui sont des amis ou des parents des fonctionnaires.  Par conséquent, des agriculteurs considèrent avec méfiance l’interruption, il a y quelques années, d’un service d’information du gouvernement au Cameroun qui tenait des agriculteurs au courant du prix actuel du marché mondial de cacao : l’ignorance des agriculteurs en matière de prix du marché mondial renforce la position des LBA. « Si nous avions des informations  sur des prix actuels, nous pourrions négocier de meilleurs prix pour nos produits », dit  Ayuk Orock.  « Comment pouvez-vous insister sur un prix de 2 $US par kilogramme quand le LBA indique que le prix du marché est de 1,50 $US et vous n’avez aucun moyen de savoir la vérité afin de pouvoir rester ferme quant à vos prix ? »

Quand on lui a demandé des commentaires, le National Prices Marketing Board du Cameroun réagit avec indignation « Qu’est-ce que les gens veulent que le gouvernement fasse ? Lorsqu’il a réglementé le commerce dans le secteur des produits, il a été accusé de manque de tact et de contrôle centralisé malsaine dans une économie de marché.  Maintenant il a supprimé le contrôle du gouvernement et les gens continuent à se plaindre.  Qu’est-ce que les gens veulent en fin de compte? »  demande un haut fonctionnaire au siège du NPMB à Douala. Les ‘gens’ aimeraient probablement que l’appareil d’Etat fonctionne comme il faut, avec des salaires acceptables pour des fonctionnaires qui font un travail acceptable.  Mais au Cameroun, comme au Nigéria et la plupart des pays ouest-africains, le système ne fonctionne pas de cette façon.

Des fonctionnaires du ministère de l’Agriculture démentent systématiquement toute corruption. Un fonctionnaire du centre de multiplication des semences (CCSP) à Kumba, sur les allégations relatives à la vente de semis et de matériel par des fonctionnaires voulait savoir si la source avait ‘quelque chose à titre de preuve pour justifier ses allégations’.  Il a demandé comment est-ce que les agriculteurs peuvent le prouver si les fonctionnaires n’ont pas donné de reçus et a affirmé que les allégations étaient ‘de mauvais goût’.  Un autre fonctionnaire a tenté de rejeter les réclamations des agriculteurs au sujet du vol de matériel ‘gratuit’ en disant qu’il y avait des « cérémonies publiques pendant lesquelles les outils agricoles sont remis gratuitement », Mais ces cérémonies sont rares et ne concernent qu’un petit nombre d’outils et de villageois.

C’est à cause de ces expériences que  FAIRTRADE a vu le jour.  Elles sont aussi la raison pour laquelle les agriculteurs dans le village de Konye ont mis leurs espoirs sur la création d’une coopérative pour traiter directement avec FAIRTRADE et un acheteur allemand.  Mais la coopérative, à ce jour, ne leur a pas donné d’outils, ou même des informations sur les prix du marché. Dat Williams n’est pas optimiste.        « Des coopératives ne jouissent pas généralement d’une bonne réputation.  Dans le passé les récoltes des gens étaient récupérées par les coopératives qui ont promis de payer plus tard. Certains agriculteurs  n’ont pas encore reçu leur dû auprès des coopératives qui sont en liquidation, » il explique ses raisons pour continuer seul.  A son avis, des coopératives et leur direction deviennent “juste un autre intermédiaire” et ne fournissent pas de solution à long terme aux problèmes d’infrastructure et d’exploitation.

« L’ensemble du système n’est pas équitable, et une institution qui le perpétue peut difficilement se dire équitable »

Si FAIRTRADE ne change pas vraiment la vie des petites agriculteurs in Afrique de l’Ouest; si le petit agriculteur ne reçoit qu’un petit don et une pompe à eau qui n’est pas durable de temps en temps, est-ce que c’est vraiment suffisant pour justifier les grosses sommes d’argent payées par les consommateurs occidentaux à l’institution FAIRTRADE ? Sinon, est-ce qu’il y a une meilleure façon d’améliorer la vie de petits cultivateurs de cacao en Afrique de l’Ouest?

Ousmane Attai, spécialiste des marchandises à Abidjan, croit qu’il y a un moyen de le faire. « La seule solution est de payer de meilleurs prix pour les récoltes. Les acheteurs, qu’ils soient certifiés FAIRTRADE ou non, et des sociétés export-import devraient faire mieux.  On dit qu’ils suivent des prix du marché libre.  Mais ce qu’ils paient est dérisoire. »  Attai pense que les acheteurs de fèves certifiés « travaillent dans la clandestinité et sont de mèche avec des hommes d’affaires malhonnêtes pour maintenir le prix moyen à un niveau faible. » (Un cadre au bureau de Cargill à Abidjan, qui a refusé d’être nommé, a rejeté ces soupçons, en disant : « Nous devons supporter de nombreux coûts »)

Plus tôt en 2012, Germain Banny, président de  l’Union Nationale des Producteurs Agricoles de Côte d’Ivoire (UNAPACI), le syndicat agricole en Côte d’Ivoire, qui en a marre de ce qu’il décrit comme « une fraude sur les prix », a fait appel aux cultivateurs de cacao afin qu’ils cessent de vendre leurs fèves à un « prix ridicule ». La grève a été de courte durée; les cultivateurs ont recommencé à vendre leurs fèves quand ils ont épuisé leurs liquidités. Est-ce que la fin aurait été différente si les agriculteurs du syndicat en grève avaient reçu un soutien international ?

La négociation collective des agriculteurs a déjà apporté des améliorations au Ghana, mais pas dans le secteur du cacao relativement peu syndicalisé.  Sur les plantations de bananes le Ghanaian Agricultural Workers’ Union (GAWU) a apporté des améliorations depuis qu’il a commencé à surveiller les pratiques des sociétés multinationales. Partout où FAIRTRADE s’applique, ils surveillent l’utilisation des fonds de prime.   Ceux-ci ont financé des fonds communs et l’assurance maladie sur certaines plantations.

Toutefois, le Secrétaire général de GAWU, Kinsley Ofei-Nkansah , a exprimé de sérieux doutes sur le système FAIRTRADE lui-même. « Il perpétue un système par lequel l’Afrique n’est qu’un producteur primaire et ne reçoit qu’un petit montant pour ses matières premières.  FAIRTRADE permet à un petit groupe de personnes de réunir des produits des petits agriculteurs sans grand profit aux producteurs et puis donne aux producteurs pauvres quelque chose connu sous le nom de « prime ». L’ensemble du système n’est pas juste, et toute institution qui le perpétue ne peut pas être considérée comme étant ‘juste’, a-t-il dit, ajoutant que la prime FAIRTRADE « n’est pas comparable à la valeur qui est affectée à l’exportateur et la chaîne de magasins de détail. »

 

 

 

Pour Dat Williams au Cameroun, il est essentiel que les agriculteurs soient habilités afin de savoir ce qui se passe, – quels prix s’appliquent, quelles subventions et quels programmes sont disponibles, – pour qu’ils puissent accroître leur pouvoir de négociation.  « Le gouvernement ou les parties prenantes appropriées du secteur de cacao devraient mettre en place des stations de radio locales pour diffuser les informations aux agriculteurs sur les prix du marché, les produits chimiques appropriés à utiliser pendant les saisons agricoles et les intrants nécessaires. »  « Si » dit-il, « ces informations sont diffusées aux agriculteurs dans leurs langues locales, cela aidera à les rendre plus aptes à faire face aux intermédiaires prédateurs. »  Tous les vétérans et les spécialistes de cacao interrogés ont convenu que seulement plus de “pouvoir” pour les agriculteurs eux-mêmes, que ce soit par le biais de revenu ou d’informations, ou de préférence les deux, les aiderait à développer leurs activités et éduquer tous leurs enfants en toute certitude.    

(FIN histoire principale)

====

Encadré 1: Des fèves de cacao au chocolat: Des pays africain en mouvement pour produire le leur

FAIRTRADE vise à créer un lien plus ‘juste’ entre le producteur de cacao et le consommateur de chocolat.  Le lien le plus équitable cependant, serait le lien le plus court : où le cacao peut être transformé en chocolat dans le pays d’origine.  Comme tous les produits fabriqués, le chocolat qui est prêt à manger peut être vendu pour bien plus d’argent qu’une fève de cacao brut.  Dans tous les pays étudiés, les programmes de soutien du gouvernement et des budgets pour les secteurs du cacao comprennent des projets pour les installations de transformation du cacao.

Le Cameroun, par exemple, a établi au cours des dernières années deux sociétés afin de fournir des installations de broyage : SIC Cacao et Chococam.  50 pour cent du capital de SIC Cacao appartient à l’Etat tandis que la plus grand entreprise mondiale de fabrication du chocolat, le conglomérat Barry-Caillebaut, détient l’autre 50 pour cent.  Sic Cacao et Chococam fonctionnent.   Au début de l’année dernière, l’entreprise camerounaise Noha Nyamedjo a annoncé qu’elle allait construire et exploiter une usine de transformation de haute technologie qui transformera environ 5 000 tonnes de fèves de cacao en poudre et liquide de haute qualité.

Des programmes de prêt pour les investissements agricoles n’ont pas encore été développés comme il faut, et certains experts se plaignent que seulement les grands agriculteurs bénéficient des facilités de crédit existantes.   Cependant, si seulement une partie des projets annoncés se concrétisent, des améliorations dans le secteur pourraient être imminentes.  Selon les chiffres officiels, la production augmentera de 14 pour cent à 300 000 tonnes en 2016.  Autrement dit, si des mesures visant à augmenter la production telles que de meilleures techniques de gestion des cultures ainsi que l’augmentation des investissements du secteur privé sont effectivement réalisés. 

Le développement de routes dans le pays annoncé sera d’une importance cruciale. Au cours des 10 prochaines années,  379 million $US seront consacrés à cette amélioration : environ 350 km de routes chaque année.  De nouvelles routes permettront aux agriculteurs de transporter leurs produits de façon plus efficace au marché, réduisant ainsi le risque de perte et assurant qu’une plus grande proportion de leur récolte peut être vendue dans le pays ou à l’étranger. Le niveau de la production de cacao et de la croissance prévue au cours des prochaines années pourrait permettre au Cameroun de dépasser le Nigéria comme le troisième producteur d’Afrique.

En Côte d’Ivoire, après un niveau le plus bas de tous les temps pour les producteurs de cacao sous le gouvernement de Gbagbo, ce qui a conduit à l’élite politique dans la capitale profitant de la quasi-totalité des revenus de cacao, les choses semblent changer. Le gouvernement travaille actuellement avec les grandes sociétés de cacao comme Mars pour augmenter le volume de production des exploitations agricoles et mener des programmes de formation.  Au Ghana, le gouvernement fournit déjà des produits chimiques, des programmes de formation et des outils agricoles aux agriculteurs sur une assez grande échelle.  

Encadré 1a (encadré au sein d’encadré1). Nigéria: “Autrefois je pouvais acheter une bicyclette”

Bien que le gouvernement du Nigéria s’engage à relancer l’industrie du cacao, les agriculteurs de ce pays – un peu comme ailleurs en Afrique de l’Ouest – ne reçoivent pas beaucoup d’encouragement concret.  Edet Akpan Jumbo, 59, à Akwa Ibom, a essayé d’établir une plantation de cacao derrière sa maison il y a dix ans, et a reçu de nouveaux plants hybrides, mais jusqu’à présent il a produit à perte.  « Autrefois je pouvais acheter une bicyclette », dit-il.  « Mais c’est tout. »  Ce sont l’extorsion des agents d’achat  et les prélèvements du gouvernement qui, selon lui, n’existent pas mais qu’il doit payer quand même,  qui sont à blâmer.  (Au Nigéria, les responsables gouvernementaux qui exigent des pots de vin parlent de « prélèvements ». D’où l’utilisation du terme « prélèvements inexistants » dans le langage national).

« Bientôt, de nombreux agriculteurs pourraient se retirer de la culture du cacao et on peut imaginer ce que cela signifie, car de plus en plus de jeunes seraient au chômage », affirme Godwin Ukwu (35), un agent d’achat autorisé et un acteur clé dans la chaîne de valeur de cacao.  Ukwu est propriétaire d’un entrepôt où les fèves de cacao sont stockées pour l’exportation. Il est également secrétaire national de publicité de l’Association de cacao du Nigéria.  Ukwu est d’accord avec le point de vue mondial qu’il s’agit de ‘agrandir ou tomber dans les oubliettes’ pour le producteur de cacao, mais croit que les gouvernements devraient aider l’industrie.  « Le Nigéria a la capacité de devenir le producteur de cacao de premier plan si des encouragements sont accordés aux agriculteurs.  Cela va créer des emplois et contribuer à réduire le niveau de pauvreté élevé dans le  pays.

FAIRTRADE est pour la plupart inconnu au Nigéria.  Selon le président de l’Association nationale de cacao, Sayina Riman, « moins d’un pour cent des producteurs de cacao au Nigéria sont au courant des dispositions de FAIRTRADE. » Les structures nationales du cacao ont mis l’accent pas tant sur un besoin de FAIRTRADE, mais un besoin d’une aide du gouvernement afin d’accéder aux acheteurs internationaux ;  une formation systématique et un programme de remise à neuf afin d’équiper des plantations de cacao pour l’agriculture moderne. « Les cultivateurs on besoin de bons plants de cacao, d’une aide avec leurs plantations et de meilleurs engrais » déclare l’acheteur Gordon Ukwu. Et cela va sans dire, la pratique d’imposer les « prélèvements inexistants » devrait être abolie.

====

Encadré 2 Mengballa

Pour augmenter leurs revenus provenant des plantations de cacao, les agriculteurs dans les régions du sud et du centre du Cameroun utilisent le jus pressé de cacao frais pour préparer un gin local populairement nommé « mengballa ». Un sac de 65 kg de fèves de cacao fraîches peut produire environ cinq litres de jus qui, lorsque brassé localement, peut produire environ un litre et demi de gin mengballa qui peut rapporter l’équivalent d’environ 4 $US. Selon les habitants, le buveur de mengballa peut être reconnu facilement car la langue, les lèvres et les dents sont tachées en noir par la liqueur noire. En raison de l’absence de normalisation, de règlementation sanitaire et de différentes façons de brassage visant à atteindre le pourcentage d’alcool le plus élevé, le visiteur inexpérimenté est conseillé de ne pas l’essayer.  Pour ces raisons il est actuellement impropre à l’exportation.

====

Encadré 3: Est-ce qu’il s’agit du travail des enfants ou du travail familial ?

FAIRTRADE met en application beaucoup de normes et critères pour les agriculteurs qui souhaitent vendre aux gros acheteurs par le biais du réseau FAIRTRADE.  Un agriculteur doit exploiter de manière respectueuse de l’environnement, utiliser certains produits chimiques et méthodes, et n’est pas autorisé à utiliser le travail des enfants, le travail saisonnier, ou le travail à des salaires inférieurs au salaire minimum.  Ce qui apparaît agréable, jusqu’à ce que l’on se rende compte que cela exclut pour la plupart tout agriculteur ouest-africain qui dépend des matériaux bon marché et de l’aide de sa famille élargie.

Au Cameroun, au Ghana et en Côte d’Ivoire, tous les agriculteurs  interrogés souhaitent que leurs enfants aillent à l’école, mais ont ajouté que, pour payer les frais scolaires, ils ne pouvaient pas se passer de l’aide des enfants le week-end et en période de récolte. Au Cameroun, les 30 plantations visitées par l’équipe d’investigation dans les régions du Sud-ouest, du Sud et du Centre, étaient détenues par des familles. Les enfants de ces familles travaillaient après l’école et le week-end, ce qui contribue à la survie de la famille.  Dan Williams, propriétaire de plantation a expliqué: « Quand il est temps de casser les cabosses de cacao, je rassemble mes enfants et les enfants de la famille pour les emmener à la plantation pour aider.  Cela est considéré comme faisant partie des tâches ménagères pour aider les parents.  Je ne le considère pas comme la maltraitance des enfants parce que nous gagnons de l’argent pour payer leurs frais scolaires.

Tous les agriculteurs interviewés souhaitaient que leurs enfants fréquentent l’école. Les seuls obstacles mentionnés, par ordre d’importance, étaient de ne pas gagner assez d’argent pour payer les frais scolaires, et l’absence d’une école à proximité. Beaucoup d’agriculteurs ont mentionné que l’interdiction du travail des enfants risquait de réduire les revenus des familles et par conséquent les chances des enfants d’aller à l’école.

Le chef Chief Bisong Etahoben a dit au sujet de l’équipe d’investigation au Cameroun « C’était une expérience passionnante quand nous, les enfants, étions emmenés dans les plantations pour casser les cabosses de cacao.  Nous sucions les fèves et buvions le jus. Il nous a paru partie de devenir un membre responsable de la famille.  Aujourd’hui mon petit frère qui travaille sur nos plantions de cacao utilise toujours ses neuf enfants pour l’aider. Nous sommes tous allés à l’école ainsi que mes neveux et mes nièces. »

Au Ghana, la scolarisation a été identifiée comme l’une des plus grandes nécessités de la coopérative Kuapa Kokoo et à travers la Côte d’Ivoire, les panneaux publicitaires en bordure des routes dans les principales villes affichent des publicités contre le travail des enfants. Les grandes entreprises dans le secteur du cacao se sont jointes à une campagne gouvernementale pour aider à l’éradiquer; le géant Mars a convenu d’allouer 2,7 million $US pour aborder les efforts contre le  travail des enfants, dont la scolarité est un élément important.

====

Notes:

(1): Le principe Arizona provient de l’initiative prise par l’association des journalistes Investigative Reporters and Editors (IRE) aux EtatsUnis, en 1976, quand le journaliste Don Bolles a été assassiné lors d’une enquête sur des activités criminelles en Arizona (US). IRE a demandé à ses membres de venir en Arizona pour travailler sur la même histoire que Bolles et de la publier partout dans le pays.  En conséquence, 38 journalistes de 28 entreprises de presse sont descendus sur Arizona pour enquêter sur les mêmes réseaux de criminalité et de corruption que Don Bolles : en d’autres termes, continuer son travail.  En conséquence, l’impact de l’histoire de Don Bolles a multiplié par 100.

(2) FAIRTRADE n’est pas le seul label de certification ayant des coopératives partenaires dans cette région. Il y a aussi des coopératives qui travaillent avec des labels qui se concentrent sur l’agriculture durable, comme UTZ et Rainforest Alliance. Ceux-ci ont été également étudiés par Kouassi. 

 (3) Des sources dans l’industrie de certification en Côte d’Ivoire (noms connus de l’équipe et du rédacteur) ont déclaré que le travail des enfants a lieu toujours même dans les plantations certifiées et que la ‘surveillance montre des lacunes’: une chose pour laquelle certains agriculteurs qui luttent afin de survivre sont reconnaissants.

(4)Le prix minimum est basé sur une estimation du ‘coût de production’ par FAIRTRADE lui-même. Le porte-parole de Max Havelaar, a lors d’un entretien, affirmé que le minimum est au moins aussi basé sur le prix que FAIRTRADE considère acceptable pour le consommateur dans le magasin.

(5) Au cours des dix dernières années, deux journalistes étrangers, Jean Hélène et Guy Andre Kieffer, ont disparu et ont probablement été assassinés au cours de leurs enquêtes sur la «mafia de cacao » en Côte d’Ivoire. Beaucoup de journalistes locaux ont fui le pays ou abandonné les enquêtes en raison des menaces persistantes.   Voir aussi http://fairwhistleblower.ca/content/cocoa-plays-key-role-ivory-coast-stalemate.

(6) Rapport: THE INTERNATIONAL FAIRTRADE MOVEMENT AND PROSPECTS FOR CAMEROONIAN PRODUCER ORGANISATIONS, Dr Michael Njume Ebong, International Development Consultant,  Project Professionnalisation Agricole et Renforcement Institutionnel (PARI ), AFD/Minader (French agriculture ministry), 2010

*Lorsqu’un nom est indiqué par un astérisque, ce nom a été changé à la demande de la personne interviewée.

11 thoughts on “Transnational Investigation: The FAIRTRADE Chocolate Rip-off”

  1. I note Dat Williams request and suggest he viists Kuapa Kokoo. It has just the radio programme he requests, it advises on fertilisers and SAFE pesticiides. If the cooperatives would get together in a pan west african network they would influebce CocoBOD in Ghana and the commodities buyers. Small scall farmers have no power as individuals.

  2. This is a serious issue.Consumers buy products well knowing that each purchase they make in a supermarket or shop is directly benefiting someone in a poor African country but this is not the case.Thank you for exposing this racket.

  3. So, what are the plans in tackling these FAIRTRADE issues? Why doesn’t the Max Havelaar organization demands more transparancy from the cooperations? Even more, do I – as a consumer – have to worry also about issues with other Fairtrade-products, like: bananas, wine, cocos, coffee, tea, sugar, coton?

  4. Now there’s food for thought. I will think twice about buying a ‘Fairtrade’ product unless I receive clear information on direct price (cash in hand) for product benefit for the farmer. Perhaps the whole emphasis on farmer inclusion into market chains as the principal motor out of poverty needs rethinking. If the ‘Fairtrade’ does not work then what models do work?

  5. There has been a lot of discussion on this issue in the fine chocolate/bean-to-bar chocolate world – something that is not widely known or gets reported by mass media or the large chocolate (cough), sorry, candy makers.

    Please check out the many fair-trade discussions on http://www.thechocolatelife.com. One producer wrote on this site, which can be found here: http://www.thechocolatelife.com/forum/topics/fair-trade-and-organic?id=1978963%3ATopic%3A19186&page=1#comments

    Here is a good article to read by Kristy Leissle PhD,as well: https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B_RKv37skpsOYzBjOWNiMDgtMDVlMS00Y2FkLWE4YzQtNTMwYjYzMWNiYjll/edit?hl=en_US&pli=1

    Having been involved for many years in the research into chocolate – it’s history as well as its modern and current issues, I know that finding truly fair-trade and good quality chocolate means looking for the really small bean-to-bar chocolate makers around the world who actually work with the growers and pay above “fair-trade” prices, as well as helping the farmers/growers out with other requirements. They are not “certified” but are sure doing a better job then the “fair-trade” organizations.

    BTW, the “fair-trade” rates are tied into the international commodities market rates – which are constantly fluctuating up and down – so while there might be a slightly higher rate, it to is always going up and down. So what are the farmers/growers getting? It is known that the bulk of the “fair-trade” money (like 80%-90%) goes into the organizations pockets.

    And yes, @ Giovanni Scheepers, you do need to pay careful attention to the other world commodities/luxury commodities. This is a very hard one to deal with, due to what you brought up – transparency. Good luck with finding that out – it takes some real intrepid investigation and a lot of time digging to find that out with most large corporations/big business.

    Small chocolate makers that are really “fair-trade”?

    Amano, Amedei, Askinosie, Domori, El-Rey, Felchlin, Grenada Chocolate, Kallari, Michel Cluzel, Original Beans, Pacari, Patric, Pralus, Republica del Cacao, Rococo, Sharkey’s, Steve DeVries, Taza, Theo, Valrhona, Waialua Estates… there are more…

    But remember, these are not candy/confection makers – these are actual Bean-to-Bar Chocolate makers – they actually take the seeds, or beans as they are called and go through the process of making the chocolate (quite involved) (who also might make confections). If the company does not make the chocolate, they are NOT bean-to-bar makers. In other words, if they melt down already produced chocolate and make confections, then they are not bean-to-bar.

  6. Thank you for writing such an insightful article. I agree with a lot of your findings, and I was also shocked by what I discovered when I visited various cocoa cooperatives. the longer you spend with a cooperative, the more you see. I saw very few farmers benefit from the certification. In my view Fairtrade provides the perfect opportunity for corrupt organisations to cover themselves. I am shocked that Flo and Fairtrade do not request more transparency. I think that it is deceitful of Fairtrade to use the farmers’ living conditions as their emotional marketing tool, when those who have spent time with producing countries know that this is not at all the case.

  7. The western supermarket chains are happy to not look too closely at any of these issues because the Fairtrade brand attracts a significant premium for them over brands selling on price. Consumers wrongly believe that they are helping farmers. They then feel good about themselves as they buy and perpetuate wrongdoing elsewhere in the world. A very sad reality of life.

  8. Some interesting and challenging points – and Fairtrade needs to learn from these and improve. I find it unlikely, though, that no good aspects of Fairtrade certification were discovered through this six month investigation. It must also be remembered that Fairtrade is not positioning itself as a panacea.

  9. To learn and to improve should be ‘business as usual’; this report however demands more then ‘business as usual’. The last three months, we’ve seen the lack of vulnerability of Fairtrade and the unwillingness to be more transparent. I think it is there for FAIR to claim arrogance and deceitful behaviour.

  10. How about a chocolate marketing board in these African countries, similiar to those in the US where the farmer get fair prices. Sounds simple enough but Africa is a tribal country controlled by thugs. & if these people are so poor then why are they having kids? It sounds like they have them so that they can put them to work & live off them.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s